Dixon Heights – Newton Fell South

View from Newton Fell South Top Dixon Heights towards Morecambe Bay

Route Introduction

Dixon Heights (Newton Fell South Top) is one of Alfred Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland. It is situated on the southern edge of the Lake District National Park. This route card suggests a fantastic route for someone peak bagging the Outlying Fells of Lakeland.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Sunday 20th December 2020. This was Outlier number 100 of 116 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag this outlying fell too.

Newton Fell South – Dixon Heights Route Stats

Fells: Newton Fell South – Dixon Heights (177m)

Total Distance: 3.69km / 2.29miles

Total Ascent: 150m / 500ft

Approx Walk Time: 1 hour

Grid Reference Start: SD 415806

Newton Fell South – Dixon Heights Route Report

The Lead Up

Earlier, my boyfriend James and I had hiked Newton Fell North from a parking area near Chapel House Forestry England. We moved the car slightly to start Newton Fell South (Dixon Heights) from Lindale, in order to avoid walking across private land.

The Approach

Waterfall on the side of the road in Lindale - The Gill
Waterfall on the side of the road in Lindale – The Gill

We parked on The Gill opposite a wonderful waterfall and walked uphill past the Royal Oak pub. Ascending past Burnbank Cottage we continued straight on up Lindale Hill. We merged onto Cartmel Lane, ignoring the road sign that indicated the vehicular route to Kendal and Lancaster. There’s no doubt about it, this is the least enjoyable stretch of this route and caution should be taken walking along this road. There are very limited parking options for this fell which necessitates the road walking, but it would soon be forgotten once we were across the main road.

James Forrest crossing the A590
James Forrest crossing the A590

At the end of the slip road we crossed the dual carriageway A590 carefully. 

James Forrest walking down Lindale Brow
James Forrest walking down Lindale Brow

At the other side of the road we made our way down the tarmac lane – Lindale Brow.

James Forrest on the approach of Newton Fell South Top- Dixon Heights
James Forrest on the approach of Newton Fell South Top- Dixon Heights

We passed through a small hamlet before following the right of way onto a track.

The Ascent

View across the south Lakeland countryside
View across the south Lakeland countryside

We passed over a stile at the side of a metal gate and ascended up the side of Newton Fell Dixon Heights, enjoying the view over the wall on our left.

James Forrest approaching the next gate
James Forrest approaching the next gate

We forked right to stay on the right of way and the trail led into woodland on grassy terrain. Passing through a wooden gate which was pinned open at time of writing we continued north.

The ascent below the crags of Newton Fell South - Dixon Heights
The ascent below the crags of Newton Fell South – Dixon Heights

Immediately after this, we forked off to the right following a faint trail, to pass under the crag.

The arch of the ruin
The arch of the ruin

We reached a ruin atop the crag and enjoyed the low sun which was creating a lovely orange glow.

James Forrest ascending Dixon Heights
James Forrest ascending Dixon Heights

Walking alongside a fence we progressed on to the south, close to gorse bushes and small trees.

Fell pony in the undergrowth
Fell pony in the undergrowth

We then peeled off to the left once we’d cleared the steep part of the crag. This was where we saw our first fell pony. A white pony in the shelter of the undergrowth.

Fell pony with a rainbow
Fell pony with a rainbow

We continued uphill and saw our second fell pony, which had a beautiful rainbow backdrop.

The Summit – Newton Fell South – Dixon Heights

Summit of Newton Fell South - Dixon Heights
Summit of Newton Fell South – Dixon Heights

From here the tower top of Newton Fell South (Dixon Heights) was in view.

Rainbow over nearby fells
Rainbow over nearby fells

We enjoyed views over nearby fells.

Morecambe Bay views
Morecambe Bay views

The views out to Morecambe Bay were particularly beautiful.

A cairn with Hampsfell in the distance with the setting sun
A cairn with Hampsfell in the distance with the setting sun

The view across to Hampsfell was stunning in the evening light.

View from Newton Fell South - Dixon Heights
View from Newton Fell South – Dixon Heights

Despite the heavily tarmacked approach, the scenery from the top of Newton Fell South – Dixon Heights was ultimately worth it.

The Descent

James Forrest descending Newton Fell South - Dixon Heights
James Forrest descending Newton Fell South – Dixon Heights

We descended over easy grassy terrain to the north. We turned left at the bottom to join the path and retraced our steps back to the car. 

Wrapping Up

Next on the Outlying Fells peak bagging agenda was a mash up of Alfred Wainwright’s Howes and Seat Robert routes in the Far Eastern Lake District.

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist, Wainwright ‘Compleator’ and is hiking her local Outlying Fells of Lakeland in the wake of the corona virus pandemic. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.

Newton Fell North

James Forrest looking down over fellside on the descent of Newton Fell North

Route Introduction

Newton Fell North Top is one of Alfred Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland. It is situated on the southern edge of the Lake District National Park. This route card suggests a fantastic route for someone peak bagging the Outlying Fells of Lakeland.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Sunday 20th December 2020. This was Outlier number 99 of 116 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag this outlying fell too.

Newton Fell North Route Stats

Fells: Newton Fell North (239m)

Total Distance: 5.49km / 3.41miles

Total Ascent: 180m / 600ft

Approx Walk Time: 2 hours

Grid Reference Start: SD 381852

Newton Fell North Route Report

The Lead Up

A fortnight earlier I’d hiked Hampsfell and Humphrey Head and now I was returning to South Lakeland to hike the nearby Newton Fell North top, followed by the Newton Fell South top (Dixon Heights) on the same day.

Starting the Walk

Chapel House - Forestry England entrance to woodland
Chapel House – Forestry England entrance to woodland

We parked in a layby opposite the ‘Chapel House- Forestry England’ sign and walked uphill following a track into the woodland.

Peeling off the track onto a footpath through the woodland
Peeling off the track onto a footpath through the woodland

After 400 metres we peeled off onto footpath that rose uphill which was grassy and a bit muddy underfoot.

View to Finsthwaite Heights from the ascent of Newton Fell North
View to Finsthwaite Heights from the ascent of Newton Fell North

We soon emerged out of the woodland and through gaps in the trees we appreciated the view over towards Finsthwaite Heights.

View to Windermere on the ascent
View to Windermere on the ascent

Soon after this Windermere came into view as we followed the finger post to the north.

James Forrest hiking into the woodland
James Forrest hiking into the woodland

The trail led into thicker woodland once more.

James Forrest forking right uphill through the trees
James Forrest forking right uphill through the trees

Once in the woodland we peeled off to the right in order to continue uphill.

James Forest hiking in the Chapel House woods
James Forest hiking in the Chapel House woods

We walked along a large score in ground through the tall trees.

Path out of the woodland
Path out of the woodland

The path was then easy to follow as it ascended and then flattened out and dipped slightly.

James Forrest pointing towards Newton Fell North
James Forrest pointing towards Newton Fell North

The path led us to a wide track where we could see the high ground of Newton Fell. We turned right on the track to head towards our target.

Following the small finger post
Following the small finger post

After 300 metres we took a sharp right following a yellow disc on a low fingerpost. The path looked overgrown at first but it was easy to follow the slim path. The scent of woodland filled our nostrils as we progressed along the trail. It was boggy and mulchy in parts but we made it through with dry feet, walking carefully over exposed wet tree roots.

Ascent over Open Fellside

James Forrest going over the stile
James Forrest going over the stile

We hopped over a stile and continued along the trail over the open fellside.

James Forrest forking left
James Forrest forking left

The handy footpath markers continued here. At a wobbly finger post we turned left to head east over rough ground towards the wall.

James Forrest following the wall to Newton Fell North
James Forrest following the wall to Newton Fell North

We then followed the wall as it undulated south. We crossed a stream and walked until a new boundary wall came into view.

James Forrest going over the stone stile
James Forrest going over the stone stile

Here we passed over a stone stile to the other side to continue following the wall on our left, all the way to the top of Newton Fell (North).

The Summit – Newton Fell North

Phone mast on Newton Fell North Top
Phone mast on Newton Fell North Top

We didn’t climb over the wall to the true highest point of the fell as Alfred Wainwright himself wrote in his book The Outlying Fells of Lakeland – ‘the game is not worth the candle’.

Looking over the High Newton Reservoirs from the summit of Newton Fell North Top
Looking over the High Newton Reservoirs from the summit of Newton Fell North Top

Instead we stood beside the ugly phone mast and surveyed the views from there, including the High Newton reservoirs to the south east.

View to Hampsfell from Newton Fell North Top
View to Hampsfell from Newton Fell North Top

The view to Hampsfell and Morecambe Bay stretched out to the south.

The Descent

James Forrest approaching Whitestone Beck
James Forrest approaching Whitestone Beck

We retraced our steps for almost a kilometre before we reached Whitestone Beck. Instead of crossing the stream by the wall like the ascent, we peeled off left at the path crossroads and crossed the stream further down.

James Forrest walking the trail on the descent of Newton Fell
James Forrest walking the trail on the descent of Newton Fell

Once on the other side we followed the path marked by a finger post to head west.

White Stone cliffs
White Stone cliffs

We admired the cliffs of White Stone to our left as we followed the trail down towards the road. When we reached the bottom we didn’t go through the gate. Instead we turned right to follow the grassy path. We exited through a gate in the corner of the field and turned right onto the lane. Another right turn at the crossroad at the bottom and we were back at our car.

Wrapping Up

Next on the Wainwright’s Outlying Fells peak bagging agenda was Newton Fell South Top Dixon Heights just down the road!

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist, Wainwright ‘Compleator’ and is hiking her local Outlying Fells of Lakeland in the wake of the corona virus pandemic. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.

Hampsfell and Humphrey Head

View to the Coniston Fells from Humphrey Head, one of Wainwright's Outlying Fells of Lakeland
View from Hampsfell
View from Hampsfell

Route Introduction

Hampsfell and Humphrey Head are the most southerly of Alfred Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland. Only Hampsfell falls within the Lake District National Park but both are beautiful fells. This route card suggests a fantastic route for someone peak bagging the Outlying Fells of Lakeland.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Monday 7th December 2020. These were Outlier numbers 97 and 98 of 116 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag these outlying fells too.

Hampsfell and Humphrey Head Route Stats

Fells: Hampsfell (220m) and Humphrey Head (53m)

Total Distance: 16.5km / 10.3miles

Total Ascent: 310m / 1,000ft

Approx Walk Time: 5 hours

Grid Reference Start: SD 390741

Hampsfell and Humphrey Head Route Report

The Lead Up

The previous day I’d hiked Dunmallard Hill and Heughscar Hill and I decided to seize upon the stable, crisp winter weather window and head down south to Grange-over-Sands to continue my peak bagging quest to hike all of the Outlying Fells of Lakeland.

The Approach to Allithwaite

From Holy Well Lane car park, I walked north over the cattle grid and headed down Holy Well Lane. After 700 metres I turned right onto the bridleway to head east.

Finger post marking the start of the bridleway
Finger post marking the start of the bridleway

At the end of bridleway, I passed through a gate and turned left to walk alongside the wall. The trail was grassy and muddy in places.

Stone stile in the wall
Stone stile in the wall

I passed over a stone stile on my left and proceeded immediately through a small gate.

Small gate leading into field
Small gate leading into field

This led across a field of sheep before leading to a passage under the railway line.

Train travelling overhead
Train travelling overhead

After exiting the tunnel I continued straight on, hugging the right hand side of the field. I crossed a tarmac track and continued walking north through a gap in the wall, following a fingerpost for the Cumbria Coastal Way.

Sign for the Cumbria Coastal Way
Sign for the Cumbria Coastal Way

I walked through another field to a gate in the top right hand corner. This led into another field and to another gate, which led onto a short boardwalk and over a stile. This field had farm buildings over to the right which I walked alongside, heading to a ladder stile.

Route past the barn to the ladder stile
Route past the barn to the ladder stile

I passed over this into the next field and went through a gate which led on to exit the field through a gate leading onto a lane. Here, I turned left and walked north along the lane before turning left again at the T-junction for Jack Hill. I then took the first right, around the front of the Pheasant Inn pub to walk uphill on Church Road through Allithwaite.

Allithwaite to Fell End

When the road forked I took the left hand fork which led onto a residential side street.

Sign to Cartmel
Sign to Cartmel

At the next junction I followed the sign for Cartmel and continued uphill passing Saint Mary’s Church and Allithwaite Primary School on my left.

I took the next right as the gradient began to flatten out onto Wart Barrow Lane. It was along this road that I saw a bench and sat and ate my lunch there.

Lunchtime view from the bench
Lunchtime view from the bench

Setting back off I soon saw the stile in the wall on the right.

Stone stile into the field
Stone stile into the field

I used this and walked along the field which cut the corner of the country road.

From here I was treated to lovely views over to the distant snow-capped Coniston fells.

View to snow capped Coniston fells
View to snow capped Coniston fells

It was only two days earlier that I was right opposite the Old Man of Coniston on Top O Selside.

I merged back onto the road over another stone stile next to a large metal gate and continued to the next T junction. Here I turned left followed by an immediate right, beside the cemetery to walk up Grange Fell Road.

Cemetery
Cemetery

I passed the golf club and continued uphill.

I took my next left onto Spring Bank Road to head north, but soon followed a finger post for Cartmel over a stone stile.

Finger post to Cartmel
Finger post to Cartmel

This led onto the open fellside. I headed north and decided to veer north west to the summit of Fell End.

Fell End to Hampsfell Hospice

Looking back on the ascent of Fell End
Looking back on the ascent of Fell End

Behind me was a beautiful view across Morecambe Bay which was glistening in the sunlight.

I left the summit to the north following a grassy trail that led to a large gate. I used the stile to the left of the gate and then ascended once again to the north.

View to Hampsfell Hospice from the descent of Fell End
View to Hampsfell Hospice from the descent of Fell End

The boxy Hampsfell Hospice soon came into view in the distance and the trail ahead led to it, passing over one more stone stile along the way.

The Summit – Hampsfell

Hampsfell Hospice
Hampsfell Hospice

At the summit I explored the Hampsfell Hospice site which was built in 1846.

Signs in Hampsfell Hospice
Signs in Hampsfell Hospice

You can peer inside and read poetry mounted on plaques.

Stone steps up to the roof of Hampsfell Hospice
Stone steps up to the roof of Hampsfell Hospice

You can also ascend the stone steps on the outside of Hampsfell Hospice to walk on the roof.

List of sights which can be seen from Hampsfell
List of sights which can be seen from Hampsfell

There you will find a list of fells and towns visible from Hampsfell plus the corresponding bearing for each. The list includes some familiar Outlying Fells of Lakeland like Black Combe, Caw and Walna Scar.

Couple reaching the summit of Hampsfell
Couple reaching the summit of Hampsfell

On a good day you can see as far as Blackpool, the Howgill fells and Ingleborough.

Viewfinder on Hampsfell Hospice
Viewfinder on Hampsfell Hospice

The viewfinder is looking a little worse for wear these days but it is very charming.

Decorated stone on Hampsfell
Decorated stone on Hampsfell

On the top there was also a stone which read ‘One day you will look back and realise the little things are the BIG things’ which for me sums up the joy of the smaller Outlying Fells of Lakeland.

The Descent – Hampsfell

The Coniston Fells from Hampsfell
The Coniston Fells from Hampsfell

As I left Hampsfell Hospice I followed one of the many trails which headed south east through the patchy sections of limestone pavement.

Limestone pavement on Hampsfell
Limestone pavement on Hampsfell

There was one slightly awkward section of limestone pavement at the bottom which would be slippery in the wet, but I got down with no worries and immediately went over the ladder stile.

Ladder stile on Hampsfell
Ladder stile on Hampsfell

The trail led downhill to a stone stile. I went over this and continued walking beside a fence along a grassy path.

I went through a gate at the bottom and turned left to head down the lane.

Gate into woodland
Gate into woodland

Following a public footpath sign on the left, I entered woodland through a metal gate. There are a few options for exiting the woodland, but my GPX trace will show that I exited using the right of way behind a large building and down multiple flights of steps through Lieutenant Colonel Austin Townsend Porritt’s Garden before reaching Main Street.

Grange-over-Sands to Humphrey Head

Here I turned right and crossed the road to head down into a large car park to gain access to the Promenade.

Tunnel under railway to promenade
Tunnel under railway to promenade

Behind the Commodore Inn there is a tunnel under the railway line which I passed through. At the other side I turned right onto the promenade.

Cyclist on Grange-over-Sands promenade
Cyclist on Grange-over-Sands promenade

I walked right to the end of the promenade and turned right under the railway. I walked along Carter Fold which led to Cart Lane. There I kept walking south past houses that must have wonderful views across the bay until the lane became a thin path.

Path towards Humphrey Head
Path towards Humphrey Head

This path led to a staircase. I turned left at the top of the staircase to walk along Kentsford Road. I soon reached Kents Bank railway station.

Kents Bank Railway Station with Humphrey Head in the distance
Kents Bank Railway Station with Humphrey Head in the distance

Here I showed caution crossing the railway and exited through the gate on the other side.

Gap in the wall towards Humphrey Head
Gap in the wall towards Humphrey Head

I passed through a gap in the wall to walk along the thin promenade in the direction of Humphrey Head which was now looming in front of me in the fading light.

It was here that I wondered if I’d make it before the sunset, so I increased my pace. The thin promenade didn’t last forever and soon I was following a mushy trail but I could now see the path that I started on, on the other side of the bay. I re-joined the path and turned right back onto the bridleway.

Gate to Humphrey Head
Gate to Humphrey Head

At the end of the bridleway I turned left, but instead of following the lane back to the car I took the next left through a gate.

The Summit – Humphrey Head

Grassy ascent of Humphrey Head
Grassy ascent of Humphrey Head

I peeled off the lane and followed the spine of Humphrey Head along the grassy trail, passing through one more gate along the way.

View from the summit of Humphrey Head
View from the summit of Humphrey Head

The true summit of this tiny fell is actually 150m before trig pillar so I took a few photos here before walking on to the trig.

Sunset at the Humphrey Head trig pillar
Sunset at the Humphrey Head trig pillar

I continued to walk part way down the nose of the limestone peninsula towards the vast expanse of Morecambe Bay.

Humphrey Head Point
Humphrey Head Point

For a moment I considered returning to the car off Humphrey Head point via the saltmarsh but I didn’t fancy crossing the soft sediment alone after sunset as the channels are often deep and impassable.

Memorial gate on Humphrey Head at sunset
Memorial gate on Humphrey Head at sunset

I therefore retraced my steps and paused at the gate by the trig pillar for a while, enjoying the sunset.

Sunset from Humphrey Head
Sunset from Humphrey Head

Today – 7th December 2020 – marked 10 years since one of the worst days of my life, a bereavement that will never leave me.

I couldn’t think of a better way to mark the day than with a glorious pink sunset in a stunning Cumbrian location.

The Descent – Humphrey Head

Pink skies above Humphrey Head after sunset
Pink skies above Humphrey Head after sunset

I considered a route off the side of the crag directly down to the car but I was told this is a very steep and slippery descent on limestone and mud so it’s not one I’d recommend alone in the dark either. I therefore retraced my steps back to Holy Well Lane and to my car.

Wrapping Up

Up next would be Newton Fell (North Top).

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist, Wainwright ‘Compleator’ and is hiking her local Outlying Fells of Lakeland in the wake of the corona virus pandemic. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.

Top O Selside and Carron Crag

View to the Coniston fells over Coniston Water from the Top O Selside hiking route
Adventurer Nic on High Light Haw
Adventurer Nic on High Light Haw

Top O Selside and Carron Crag Route Introduction

Top O Selside and Carron Crag are two routes featured in Alfred Wainwright’s book – The Outlying Fells of Lakeland. The original routes take in 5 tops in the south of the Lake District National Park. This route card mashes the two routes together into one longer route and is a fantastic option for someone peak bagging the Outlying Fells of Lakeland.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Saturday 5th December 2020. These were Outlier numbers 90 to 94 of 116 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag these outlying fells too.

Top O Selside and Carron Crag Route Stats

Fells: Carron Crag (314m), High Light Haw (263m), Low Light Haw (250m) and Brock Barrow (221m).

Total Distance: 18.2km / 11.3miles

Total Ascent: 470m / 1,550ft

Approx Walk Time: 6 hours

Grid Reference Start: SD 336942

Top O Selside and Carron Crag Route Report

The Lead Up

It had been a couple of months since my last Outlying Fells of Lakeland walk which was Great Worm Crag, The Pike and Hesk Fell back in September. It was now early December and the Lake District had experienced it’s first snowfall of the winter season.

My boyfriend James and I decided to hike Carron Crag and the Top O Selside fells on this sunny Saturday from Grizedale main car park.

The Ascent

Grizedale Car Park and Visitors Centre
Grizedale Car Park and Visitors Centre

We left the car park and headed west down the side road following a sign to Grizedale Forest Office. Crossing over the bridge and passing a farm, we peeled off the track to head uphill on a bridleway.

The start of the bridleway
The start of the bridleway

We found ourselves following a moss covered dry stone wall. Part way along the wall we were very surprised to see some graffiti art. These painted bricks featured the logos of common outdoors brands.

Outdoor brand graffiti art on a dry stone wall in Grizedale Forest
Outdoor brand graffiti art on a dry stone wall in Grizedale Forest

We kept to the left until the bridleway joined a much wider track, we turned right onto this and walked for around 200m before taking the first left uphill.

Trail leading uphill through Grizedale Forest
Trail leading uphill through Grizedale Forest

On this route, we passed one of Grizedale forest’s many sculptures entitled RUUP – from ‘ruupor’ which translates to ‘megaphone’ in Estonian.

RUUP sculpture in Grizedale Forest
RUUP sculpture in Grizedale Forest

The three sculptures were designed by Birgit Õigus and placed on the Carron Crag trail through the forest. As the artist’s aim was to encourage folk to stop and listen to the woodland sounds, we did just that.

James Forrest having a good look at the RUUP sculpture in Grizedale Forest
James Forrest having a good look at the RUUP sculpture in Grizedale Forest

After our spot of forest bathing we continued on the trail before turning right at the cross roads at the top onto a tarmac track. We then took the second left onto a stony path.

We followed the trail all the way to another sculpture of Grizedale forest.

17 Degrees South Sculpture in Grizedale Forest
17 Degrees South Sculpture in Grizedale Forest

This time it was a 1997 sculpture by Linda Watson entitled 17 Degrees South.

We continued uphill until we reached the short scramble onto the summit of Carron Crag.

James Forrest reaching the summit of Carron Crag
James Forrest reaching the summit of Carron Crag

The Summit – Carron Crag

Here we enjoyed views over the forest to the Coniston fells which looked like they’d received a nice sprinkling of snow.

View to the Coniston Fells over Grizedale Forest tree tops from the summit of Carron Crag
View to the Coniston Fells over Grizedale Forest tree tops from the summit of Carron Crag

We also noticed Helvellyn to the north was completely white!

Adventurer Nic at the trig pillar summit of Carron Crag with a snowy Helvellyn behind her
Adventurer Nic at the trig pillar summit of Carron Crag with a snowy Helvellyn behind her

The Descent – Carron Crag

My technique of choice coming off Carron Crag was the trusty bum shuffle! With my feet firmly back on the ground we continued in a northerly direction on a stony path which led us downhill.

Wide forestry trails in Grizedale Forest
Wide forestry trails in Grizedale Forest

This merged onto a wider track where we turned left to continue heading north through the forest. After 1km we turned left again onto another wide forestry track which led south west.

Our first proper peek at Coniston Water on the Way to the Top O Selside fells
Our first proper peek at Coniston Water on the Way to the Top O Selside fells

Continuing on the main track, we walked until Coniston Water appeared to our right with the fells rising up behind. It was a gorgeous view.

Following a fingerpost signed to ‘Parkamoor’, we turned right off the main track and into dense woodland. Despite the closing in of the trees, the trail was firm and obvious and I actually really enjoyed this section of the route. I love the smell of woodland and it was super strong here.

Approaching the Top O Selside Fells

We passed through a gate which led out of the woodland and onto open terrain.

Adventurer Nic overlooking Coniston Water en route to the Top O Selside fells
Adventurer Nic overlooking Coniston Water en route to the Top O Selside fells

The views to the Coniston fells were now completely unimpeded by the forest as we stood and admired the view from Park Crags.

'Cottage in the Clouds'
‘Cottage in the Clouds’

We continued straight ahead, all the while our eyes were drawn to Top O Selside in front of us. Passing through another gate, we continued over the grassy trail which led to Parkamoor House ‘the cottage in the clouds’ which is a beautiful ‘off grid’ cottage which appears available to rent.

We passed through another gate and followed the trail to the right as it skirted around the base of Top O Selside along it’s western flank.

View back towards the cottage from the flanks of Top O Selside
View back towards the cottage from the flanks of Top O Selside

We looked behind us to appreciate the beauty of the cottage from the opposite side, together with the trail that had led us to this point.

A post in the ground marked the left turn required for us to start heading towards High Light Haw.

A grassy path led uphill and then forked right to head south. At this point in the walk the trail becomes rather boggy and indistinct in parts as it undulates towards the higher ground.

We stopped for a cheese and pickle sandwich on a couple of rocks beside the trail here.

Looking up to High Light Haw
Looking up to High Light Haw

After lunch we kept following the trail south, ultimately peeling off the path when we had High Light Haw in our sights.

The Summit – High Light Haw

View towards The Old Man of Coniston and Coniston Water from High Light Haw
View towards The Old Man of Coniston and Coniston Water from High Light Haw

The summit of High Light Haw was simply beautiful.

The views were stunning. Not only did the Coniston Fells look fantastic, but the triangular summit of Harter Fell looked charming.

View towards Harter Fell from High Light Haw
View towards Harter Fell from High Light Haw

Black Combe rose to mark the most southerly point of Copeland.

View towards Black Combe from the summit of High Light Haw
View towards Black Combe from the summit of High Light Haw

I could also see all the fells around Beacon Tarn and down to Blawith Knott and Burney which was one of my favourite Outlying Fells walks of 2020.

James Forrest approaching a cairn on High Light Haw
James Forrest approaching a cairn on High Light Haw

We passed a cairn on the way towards Low Light Haw and followed the trail down to the col between the two outlying fells.

James Forrest hiking towards Low Light Haw
James Forrest hiking towards Low Light Haw

There were plenty of faint paths to follow but we mainly judged it by eye and weaved our way through the bracken and heather to reach the summit of Low Light Haw.

The Summit – Low Light Haw

Low Light Haw summit cairn
Low Light Haw summit cairn

The summit of Low Light Haw was marked by a cairn and the view was very similar to that of High Light Haw as the tops are a mere stones throw away from each other.

Views from Low Light Haw
Views from Low Light Haw

It was here that we observed a pack of hounds participating in a nearby hunt.

We descended down to the south west in the direction of Brock Barrow. The summit of Brock Barrow is enclosed by a circular stone wall.

Passing through a gap in the wall to Brock Barrow
Passing through a gap in the wall to Brock Barrow

There are many gaps in the wall. We simply picked a gap, stepped through and made our way to the summit.

The Summit – Brock Barrow


Many people bagging the Outlying Fells of Lakeland seek out Wainwright’s tops, others are happy with the true summits of each fell (the highest point). In this case we bagged the highest point but the Wainwright summit can be seen in the photo below.

View to the Wainwright summit of Brock Barrow
View to the Wainwright summit of Brock Barrow

We headed down from the summit in a southerly direction in order to pick up a path which led through a substantial gap in the wall.

Gap in the wall on Brock Barrow
Gap in the wall on Brock Barrow

We then followed the trail down through bracken to a crossing point of Caws Beck.

Crossing Caws Beck
Crossing Caws Beck

We picked up the trail on the other side and hiked alongside a wall.

Even from here, the Consiton fells commanded our attention. The scene was very autumnal in the foreground and wintery in the background as we looked across at Low Light Haw.

Views with autumn in the foreground and winter in the background
Views with autumn in the foreground and winter in the background

At the wall corner, the trail continued to head north towards Top O Selside.

James walking towards Top O Selside
James walking towards Top O Selside

We followed a variety of sheep trods which varied in quality as we continued north over undulating terrain until we reached the cairned summit of Top of Selside.

James Forrest walking towards Top O Selside
James Forrest walking towards Top O Selside

The Summit – Top O Selside

The last fell of the day always feels super special to me as the sunlight tends to be low and really magical. I had a real moment as I sat on the edge of the summit cairn.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Top O Selside
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Top O Selside

I breathed in deeply with the winter sun kissing my cheeks and really felt happy to be outdoors in my beloved Lake District.

Top O Selside views to the Coniston fells
Top O Selside views to the Coniston fells

Top O Selside Descent

For the descent of Top O Selside, we headed off piste through tufty grass aiming for the path crossroads around three quarters of a kilometre away to the north.

Adventurer Nic on the descent of Top O Selside
Adventurer Nic on the descent of Top O Selside

At the cross roads we went straight on towards the woodland in a north easterly direction. It was very wet underfoot here but we just about kept our feet dry hopping over the deeper sections of bog and puddles.

The wet trail towards Grizedale
The wet trail towards Grizedale

We passed through a gate and continued walking through the woodland to the north east.

James Forrest entering the woodland section of the descent
James Forrest entering the woodland section of the descent

At the next trail junction we turned left and then went straight on at the next crossroad which was almost immediate.

At the next T junction we turned right and then immediately forked left onto a small path through the woodland.

James Forrest taking the smaller path
James Forrest taking the smaller path

At the next two crossroads we went straight on and then retraced our steps back to the car from here.

Wrapping Up

What next? Heughscar Hill and Dunmallard Hill beckoned. These would be my next two Outlying Fells.

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist, Wainwright ‘Compleator’ and is hiking her local Outlying Fells of Lakeland in the wake of the corona virus pandemic. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.

Blawith Knott

View from Wool Knott over Beacon Tarn

…Burney, Beacon Fell and more!

Blawith Knott Route Introduction

Blawith Knott is one of Alfred Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland. This hike links Blawith Knott to 5 other outlying fells in the south of the Lake District National Park over a distance of 20km including Burney, Tottlebank Height, Wool Knott, Yew Bank and Beacon Fell. This route card is a fantastic option for someone peak bagging the Outlying Fells of Lakeland.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Monday 24th August 2020. These were Outlier numbers 77 to 82 of 116 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag these outlying fells too.

Blawith Knott, Burney, Beacon Fell and More Route Stats

Fells: Burney (298m), Blawith Knott (248m), Tottlebank Height (236m), Wool Knott (223m), Yew Bank (207m) and Beacon Fell (255m).

Total Distance: 20km / 12.4miles

Total Ascent: 770m / 2,525ft

Approx Walk Time: 7 hours

Grid Reference Start: SD 262849

Blawith Knott Route Report

The Lead Up

Previous to this walk, I’d hiked Orrest Head, School Knott and Brant Fell which involved a broken leg and an encounter with Langdale/Ambleside Mountain Rescue Team. I was hopeful that this day of walking would be much less eventful!

The Ascent

I parked in the big layby on the A5092 on a sunny morning in the southern Lake District. I had just dropped my partner James off in Keswick to start his walk of the 214 Wainwright fells in a single round and I was feeling emotional! A hike alone in the outlying fells to clear my head was just what I needed.

I walked west along road for a short distance before turning right to follow a sign which read ‘Woodland 3 Miles’. I walked over the cattle grid and continued along the tarmac single track road.

Over the cattle grid at the start of the walk
Over the cattle grid at the start of the walk

After 400m I turned right to head steeply up a grassy path.

The grassy path up Burney
The grassy path up Burney

To the left in the distance I could see over towards Duddon Sands.

View towards Duddon Sands from the ascent of Burney
View towards Duddon Sands from the ascent of Burney

The navigation to the first summit was easy as the grassy path led right to the top of my first fell of the day – Burney.

There is a trig point on the summit of Burney but the grassy lump 10 metres away is actually the highest point of the fell. So I deviated there for a photo.

The trig point for Burney
The trig point for Burney

The Summit – Burney

The views were absolutely outstanding at this early stage and I knew I was in for treat for the rest of the walk.

View from Burney with Black Combe on the left
View from Burney with Black Combe on the left

I could pick out Black Combe, Buckbarrow, Whit Fell, Stickle Pike, Caw and Walna Scar up and onto the Coniston Fells along the skyline and it was stunning!

View from Burney to the Coniston Fells and beyond
View from Burney to the Coniston Fells and beyond

I suppressed a pang of sadness that I was experiencing such beauty alone.

Blawith Knott and the route ahead from Burney
Blawith Knott and the route ahead from Burney

Blawith Knott was visible up ahead and I followed the grassy path from the summit of Burney which headed off to the north-east.

As the ground became a little slushy underfoot, I took a small detour to visit Burney’s sibling – Little Burney. I went over the summit of Little Burney and headed north-west over pathless but easy grassy ground until I picked up an established path. If you’re not keen on visiting Little Burney, you can stay on the path the whole time and cut out this pathless section.

The path became a little steep and loose as it descended towards a crossroad in the path.

Path crossroad between Little Burney and Blawith Knott
Path crossroad between Little Burney and Blawith Knott

I continued straight on and the path led over a stream, weaved through bracken and then navigated across boggy terrain to gain higher ground onto a tarmac road.

Here I turned left and walked along the road, ignoring the first right-hand fork. Instead I turned right at the main junction, following a cycle fingerpost.  

Junction in the road en route to Blawith Knott
Junction in the road en route to Blawith Knott

From this junction I continued along the tarmac road uphill before the road started to descend giving me a clear view of my route of ascent up the south-west ridge of Blawith Knott.

View to Blawith Knott from the road section
View to Blawith Knott from the road section

The turn off for the grassy path up Blawith Knott came after around 1km of walking on the road and was just after a stream crossing.

I followed the path directly to summit of Blawith Knott.

The Summit – Blawith Knott

The summit cairn of Blawith Knott
The summit cairn of Blawith Knott

Blawith Knott was marked by a cairn.

I saw one other hillwalker approaching the summit just as I was leaving.

I left the summit to the east with Tottlebank Height in my sights. Again, I followed a grassy path, this time down through some bracken.

Small tarn between Blawith Knott and Tottlebank Height
Small tarn between Blawith Knott and Tottlebank Height

There wasn’t much of a drop between these two fells. I passed a small tarn to the left.

Then I continued on before taking a right-hand fork in the path up to the summit of Tottlebank Height.

The right fork up to Tottlebank Height
The right fork up to Tottlebank Height

The Summit – Tottlebank Height

It didn’t seem like five minutes since I was atop Blawith Knott but here I was on Tottlebank Height!

View from the summit cairn of Tottlebank Height
View from the summit cairn of Tottlebank Height

I paused for a short while on the summit to enjoy the view before heading down to the north/north-west.

Adventurer Nic on Tottlebank Height
Adventurer Nic on Tottlebank Height

In hindsight it probably would have been easier to retrace my steps to the path junction and turn right as it was a little bit of a tricky initial descent over grassy tufts and bracken with a few hidden boulders to navigate over before I reached the bottom path.

View from the bottom path towards Wool Knott
View from the bottom path towards Wool Knott

I passed a small group of people with binoculars before crossing a stream. At the next path crossroads I continued straight on towards Wool Knott.

Path crossroads between Tottlebank Height and Wool Knott
Path crossroads between Tottlebank Height and Wool Knott

I crossed another couple of streams as I followed the trail uphill. The path snaked through the bracken towards Wool Knott. I peeled off the path to the right as it bent left at the top of the pass in order to reach the summit of my fourth outlying fell of the day – Wool Knott.

The Summit – Wool Knott

The views from Wool Knott summit are simply beautiful. Not only was it my favourite fell view of the day, it is certainly in my top five of outlying fells so far.

View from Wool Knott towards Beacon Tarn
View from Wool Knott towards Beacon Tarn

Wool Knott overlooks Beacon Tarn which was shimmering in the sunlight. It was also a great vantage point to see the remaining two fells I was going to hike that day – Yew Bank and Beacon Fell.

I paused and had lunch on the summit of Wool Knott so that I could enjoy the view for a little longer.

As I left the summit of Wool Knott I initially retraced my steps, but then I headed north west to a grassy trod which led down to the main path.

Views en route from Wool Knott to Yew Bank
Views en route from Wool Knott to Yew Bank

I turned left on the main path which was wide and grassy and followed it until it crossed Mere Syke. From there I forked right to follow a smaller trail through bracken, traversing the northern flanks of Woodland Fell.

Taking the right fork in the path
Taking the right fork in the path

I forked right twice more, heading downhill passing a large tree on the left. This led through more bracken and to Green Moor Beck, which I crossed at a ford.  

Green Moor Beck
Green Moor Beck

After crossing the stream I walked north, keeping the wall on my left.

Following the wall
Following the wall

The path continued to lead north loosely following the wall.

There were a variety of options here but all trails meet together further up. I chose to cross Hodge Wife Gill near the wall.

Hodge Wife Gill
Hodge Wife Gill

The grass was often wet underfoot so I chose the driest of the interconnecting grassy pathways to follow uphill through the bracken. As long as you’re going north-east on one of the grassy paths uphill, you can’t really go wrong.

The Summit – Yew Bank

My trail led me to the col between Yew Ban and Rattan Haw, so I turned left at the top to bag Yew Bank.

Views from the large summit cairn of Yew Bank
Views from the large summit cairn of Yew Bank

The summit of Yew Bank was marked with a big cairn. I was surrounded by lovely purple heather which was still in bloom on this late August day.

From the summit I followed a faint path to the east over Rattan Haw. I passed a wind shelter and soon the path disappeared and the heather and bracken thickened.

The wind shelter
The wind shelter

I headed ‘off piste’ to the right heading towards what looked like a path that ran parallel that was slightly lower down. This path soon too disappeared so I picked the path of least resistance through the tufty grass and heather towards Beacon Fell in the west.

Pathless walking through heather and tufty grass towards Beacon Fell
Pathless walking through heather and tufty grass towards Beacon Fell

These fells were definitely the most problematic to link up as it involved around a kilometre of tough pathless walking, but that’s part of the excitement of executing four of Wainwright’s routes in one day. You’re probably doing a route that few people have done, so it makes it extra special.

When I made it to the main path I turned left and I only had one more ascent to go. I walked north on the path immediately below Beacon Fell and turned right to follow a steep path up the side of the fell to the north-east.

Coniston Fells from the ascent of Beacon Fell
Coniston Fells from the ascent of Beacon Fell

Half way up the ascent the path disappeared but it was easy to make a beeline to the summit on a compass bearing, easily avoiding the crags and steep ground.

I tried not to get too distracted by the brilliant views of the Coniston fells (and I failed).

The Summit – Beacon Fell

I arrived at the summit of Beacon Fell to a father and son flying a drone together.

Beacon Fell is marked by a large cairn and from here I could see the Top O’ Selside fells on the other side of Coniston Water.

Views from Beacon Fell to Top O'Selside fells
Views from Beacon Fell to Top O’Selside fells

I could also see as far as Helvellyn to the north.

View from Beacon Fell towards Helvellyn over Coniston Water
View from Beacon Fell towards Helvellyn over Coniston Water

The Descent

I left the summit of Beacon Fell following an established trail to the south-west.

The start of the descent from Beacon Fell
The start of the descent from Beacon Fell

The tarn came into view and was just as sparkling and magical as it had looked from the other side on Wool Knott. By the time I reached the edge of the tarn I realised I was now on the Cumbria Way.

The beautiful Beacon Tarn from Beacon Fell
The beautiful Beacon Tarn from Beacon Fell

I walked south along the Cumbria Way which soon ran alongside a dry stone wall on my right beside some woodland which offered some much appreciated shade.

The path then weaved through bracken, through a gate, crossed over Greenholme Beck and led uphill into woodland.

Through the gate into the woodland
Through the gate into the woodland

The path then did a u-turn to the right to run alongside a wall. This led through another gate and along a path with walls on either side of the trail. This opened out into a field where I kept the wall on my right. I passed through another gate at the end. After this gate I turned left. When the path forked beside a large boulder in an opening I kept right. Keeping right kept me on the Cumbria Way where the grassy path rose.

Heading uphill on the Cumbria Way
Heading uphill on the Cumbria Way

I glanced behind me on this section to see the most beautiful view of the fells to the north.

I passed to the left of Tottlebank Height. And at the end of the footpath I turned left onto a farm track which soon merged into a tarmac road. I walked down the road until I saw a fingerpost for a public bridleway.

Public Bridleway sign
Public Bridleway sign

I took this right fork and walked down the grassy track. When the track split I took the right-hand fork which led over a stile.

Ladder stile over the wall
Ladder stile over the wall

I continued across the field following the trail, which ultimately bent east to run alongside a dry stone wall.

The Home Straight

I passed through a series of gates keeping the Kiln Bank farm buildings on my left. At this point I left the Cumbria Way by continuing south. I passed through a metal gate and peeled off the track following the right of way down to the stream. Crossing the stream using the small stone bridge, I continued heading south.

Stone bridge over the stream
Stone bridge over the stream

I then crossed over the wall using the stile. Then, I headed across the field to the stile in the next wall. After this, I continued on passing through a gate in the bottom right of the field. From here I turned right to walk along the track at Raisthwaite.

I passed through the farm yard and through a gate to a tree-lined path. I crossed the stream and went through another gate. Hiking across the field, I went through the gate in the top right of the field and walked straight on following the grassy trail.

I crossed a road and continued straight on, and then crossed a track to continue uphill. I passed a big boulder with a tree growing out of it which boggled my mind.

Tree growing out of a boulder
Tree growing out of a boulder

The final challenge was to make it over the boggy ground to the col to the east of Burney. My legs were tired at this point and I was craving a cold drink! There were no real paths to follow here due to the terrain. This meant it was hard going, but I kept sneaking peeks behind me at the stunning views. Once at the col the path reappeared and I walked downhill to the right of a wall.

Walking alongside a dry stone wall towards the end of the walk
Walking alongside a dry stone wall towards the end of the walk

I dropped down onto the road and retraced my steps over the cattle grid back to the car.

Wrapping Up

Potter Fell would be my next Outlying Fells of Lakeland walk.

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist, Wainwright ‘Compleator’ and is hiking her local Outlying Fells of Lakeland in the wake of the corona virus pandemic. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.

Latterbarrow and Claife Heights

A beautiful mountain view over Wise Een Tarn in the Lake District
View from Latterbarrow, The Lake District
View from Latterbarrow, The Lake District

Route Introduction

Latterbarrow and Claife Heights are two of Alfred Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland. They’re situated in the south of the Lake District National Park. This route card suggests a fantastic route for someone peak bagging the Outlying Fells of Lakeland.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Wednesday 29th July 2020. These were Outlier numbers 70 and 71 of 116 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag these outlying fells too.

Latterbarrow and Claife Heights Route Stats

Fells: Latterbarrow (244m) and Claife Heights (270m)

Total Distance: 12km / 7.48miles

Total Ascent: 304m / 1,000ft

Approx Walk Time: 4 hours

Grid Reference Start: SD 379954

Latterbarrow and Claife Heights Route Report

The Lead Up

I’d walked all of my previous Outlying Fells of Lakeland with either my boyfriend James or with friends so it was refreshing to hike these two outliers alone. The previous week I’d hiked the Naddle Horseshoe in the far east of the Lake District National Park.

Starting the Hike

Donation point for the car park at Braithwaite Hall in Far Sawrey
Donation point for the car park at Braithwaite Hall in Far Sawrey

I parked in the car park at Braithwaite Hall and paid by donation in the box by the entrance. Heading left out of the car park I walked past the Cuckoo Brow Inn and then turned right to walk steeply uphill on a tarmac road.

The Cuckoo Brow Inn, Far Sawrey
The Cuckoo Brow Inn, Far Sawrey

It would be five and half kilometres of walking before I reached the summit of my first Outlying Fell – Latterbarrow.

View over the dry stone wall to beautiful English countryside
View over the dry stone wall to beautiful English countryside

The view over the dry stone wall was beautiful, overlooking rolling fields of green. I walked over the cattle grid and then followed a finger post onto a track, which led to a foot bridge over the Wilfin Beck.

Foot bridge over Wilfin Beck, the Lake District
Foot bridge over Wilfin Beck, the Lake District

Crossing the bridge, I picked up the rocky footpath on the other side which led to a gate. I then went through another gate before turning right onto a wider track which continued north with walls on either side.

After passing through another gate, I hopped over the Wilfin Beck yet again, this time on stepping stones.

Stepping stones over Wilfin Beck
Stepping stones over Wilfin Beck

The path then led up until Moss Eccles Tarn came into view on my left.

Moss Eccles Tarn, the Lake District
Moss Eccles Tarn, the Lake District

I carried on, following the finger posts, as the path wound through fields of calm cattle, until I reached another gate.

Gate on the ascent of Latterbarrow
Gate on the ascent of Latterbarrow

Beyond this gate was a wow moment. A simply stunning view of the higher Lakeland fells opened up in front of me over the top of Wise Een Tarn.

Sheep in front of Wise Een Tarn with the Lake District mountains as a backdrop
Sheep in front of Wise Een Tarn with the Lake District mountains as a backdrop

The Langdale Pikes looked sharp and jagged on the right of the skyline and the Scafell range loomed in the centre with Wetherlam off to the left. I was in awe!

Continuing the Ascent

Mountain bikers on the trail ahead cycling towards Latterbarrow
Mountain bikers on the trail ahead cycling towards Latterbarrow

After passing the Scale Tarn on my right, the path became grassier underfoot. I followed the path which soon ran alongside a wall on my left and then continued up and into the woodland through a gate.

Gate leading into the woodland
Gate leading into the woodland

I really enjoyed the woodland trails of this walk, they were so full of bird chatter, it was much cooler thanks to the shade of the tall tress and I found the earthy woodland scent to be so calming.

Woodland trails en route to Latterbarrow
Woodland trails en route to Latterbarrow

350m after passing through the gate into the woods I followed a finger post which branched off the main path to the left. This led to a crossroads at the bottom, where I turned left to follow a wider track.

Left at the crossroads
Left at the crossroads

At the next major crossroad I turned left again, and followed the path for another 200m before turning right, avoiding passing through the gap in the wall ahead and instead following the path north.

The right hand turn before the wall
The right hand turn before the wall

This part of the route was narrow and muddy at times.

I followed the trail downhill before it rose up again up some steps.

The steps on the trail towards Latterbarrow
The steps on the trail towards Latterbarrow

It weaved, twisted and turned for a while before I turned left at the next t-junction, surrounded by Christmas trees. I followed the trail over a large gap in a wall before it led to a stile. Over the stile, I turned right to start the final ascent of Latterbarrow.

I could see the summit of Latterbarrow from a distance due to the prominent summit obelisk
I could see the summit of Latterbarrow from a distance due to the prominent summit obelisk

The Summit – Latterbarrow

The summit of Latterbarrow is not the huge monument (that you’d probably expect it to be), it is in fact a small rock 3 metres away. But there’s no doubt about it, the tower on the summit of Latterbarrow is what draws the eye, both when you’re nearing the summit and from afar.

Summit of Latterbarrow
Summit of Latterbarrow

The obelisk is many metres tall and stands proud atop the 244m fell.

Summit of Latterbarrow, the Lake District
Summit of Latterbarrow, the Lake District

The walk from Colthouse is a popular one and I saw multiple families all arrive at the summit and sit down in their small groups to enjoy lunch on the summit of Latterbarrow. It was a glorious day to enjoy the views across the Lake District. As good as the views were towards the nearer fells like Wansfell Pike to the north east, I couldn’t take my eyes of the Langdale Pikes to the north west over the top of Black Fell.

Summit of Latterbarrow, an Outlying Fell of Lakeland
Summit of Latterbarrow, an Outlying Fell of Lakeland

Linking Latterbarrow and Claife Heights

I left the summit of Latterbarrow with a full stomach and retraced my steps.

View down to Hawkshead from the descent of Latterbarrow
View down to Hawkshead from the descent of Latterbarrow

I enjoyed a lovely view of Hawkshead as I returned to the stile at the bottom of the hill and continued back along the same path I’d taken earlier. When I came to the second of the two main crossroads I’d encountered earlier, this time I continued straight on.

As the main track bent around to the right, I took the footpath which led straight on following a finger post.

The left turn from the main track
The left turn from the main track

230m later the path forked again, and I turned right to head uphill on a forest path.

Forest trails
Forest trails

As I glanced to the right through the trees I caught a glimpse of Lake Windermere and the Fairfield fells beyond.

View to Lake Windermere through the trees on the Claife Heights section of the walk
View to Lake Windermere through the trees on the Claife Heights section of the walk

This section of the route was by far the quietest of the day. I didn’t see many people at all between here and the Claife Heights (High Blind How) trig pillar.

The path led me through the woodland, over a foot bridge, before leading me down onto another wide track.

Footbridge en route to Claife Heights from Latterbarrow
Footbridge en route to Claife Heights from Latterbarrow

I turned right onto this track for only a short distance before following another finger post marked ‘Far Sawrey 2 Miles’.

Finger post to Far Sawrey
Finger post to Far Sawrey

This section of the walk was really pretty, with established woodland and beautiful fox gloves popping up all over.

Foxgloves in the woodland
Foxgloves in the woodland

I forked right before the path started to dip downhill to continue uphill towards the summit.

At the next fork in the path, I turned left which led through bracken to the Claife Heights trig pillar (High Blind How).

The Summit – Claife Heights

Touching the summit trig point of Claife Heights (High Blind How)
Touching the summit trig point of Claife Heights (High Blind How)

Alfred Wainwright wrote in his book – the Outlying Fells of Lakeland – that this trig pillar was now lost in conifers and inaccessible, but it is possible now, you just have to follow the trail, weaving through a sea of shoulder-height bracken to get there!

The summit trig pillar of Claife Heights (High Blind How)
The summit trig pillar of Claife Heights (High Blind How)

I paused for quite some time on the summit rocks. It was so peaceful. There was nobody else around and it was so quiet. I just sat alone and listened to the breeze pass through the trees for what felt like ages.

The Descent

When it came time to leave, I continued along the bracken-filled path to rejoin the woodland path which was covered in pine needles and soft underfoot.

Woodland trails to start the descent
Woodland trails to start the descent

I reached the valley bottom and crossed a foot bridge over a stream which fed Three Dubs Tarn over to the west.

Bridge over the stream
Bridge over the stream

I picked up the path on the other side of the foot bridge and walked up past a finger post signed to ‘Sawrey Ferry’.

Signpost to Sawrey Ferry
Signpost to Sawrey Ferry

The trail led up and over lumpy terrain to reach a view point of Windermere lake and weaved around some large crags.

View towards Windermere
View towards Windermere

I continued along the trail, following the finger posts which were now very regular. At one point I stopped to give directions to Three Dubs Tarn to a Scottish couple who were away on holiday.

Signpost to Far Sawrey across with a Windermere backdrop
Signpost to Far Sawrey across with a Windermere backdrop

At a t-junction in the path I turned right, again signposted for ‘Far Sawrey’. Along this path I went through a gate and continued south, keeping the wall on my left.

Views from the descent towards Far Sawrey
Views from the descent towards Far Sawrey

At this point the track twisted and undulated beside some impressive dry stone walls and later, there were walls running either side of the trail.

Walled footpath
Walled footpath

At the next path junction I turned right to join the bridleway.

Right to join the bridleway at the finger post
Right to join the bridleway at the finger post

Keeping the wall on my right, I followed the bridleway down to meet the track at the bottom. Passing through the gate a beautiful view opened up on my right.

Final view of the descent of my Latterbarrow and Claife Heights adventure
Final view of the descent of my Latterbarrow and Claife Heights adventure

The path brought me out right opposite my car.

Wrapping Up

Next on the list was Orrest Head, School Knott and Brant Fell, a walk where the phrase ‘break a leg‘ was taken quite literally!

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist, Wainwright ‘Compleator’ and is hiking her local Outlying Fells of Lakeland in the wake of the corona virus pandemic. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.

Walna Scar

Adventurer Nic descending Green Pikes before heading to Walna Scar

…Caw, Stickle Pike and more!

Adventurer Nic and her friend Laura heading to Stickle Pike
Adventurer Nic and her friend Laura heading to Stickle Pike

Walna Scar, Caw, Stickle Pike and More – Route Introduction

Walna Scar is the highest of all of Alfred Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland. This hike links Walna Scar to 9 other outlying fells in the south of the Lake District National Park over a distance of 26km. This route card is a fantastic option for someone peak bagging the Outlying Fells of Lakeland.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Wednesday 24th June 2020. These were Outlier numbers 39 to 48 of 116 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag these outlying fells too.

Walna Scar, Caw, Stickle Pike and More – Route Stats

The trig pillar on Great Stickle
The trig pillar on Great Stickle

Fells: Great Stickle (305m), Dunnerdale Fells (280m), Tarn Hill (313m), Stickle Pike (375m), a nameless summit 1183′ (361m), The Knott (284m), Caw (529m), Pikes (469m), Green Pikes (420m) and Walna Scar (621m)

Total Distance: 26.1km / 16.22miles

Total Ascent: 1,090m / 3,576ft

Approx Walk Time: 10 hours

Grid Reference Start: SD 201917

Walna Scar, Caw, Stickle Pike and More – Route Report

The Lead Up

A few days earlier we’d hiked the Bannisdale Horseshoe and Knipescar Common, two great walks on the far eastern edge of the Lake District National Park. After a couple of days rest we headed to Ulpha to take on another big day in the hills.

James and I met our good friend Laura in the car park on the road between Ulpha and Stonestar. Laura is a postal worker in the Windermere post office but was making the most of her week off with some hiking.

The Ascent

The ascent was straight forward as there was a clear path which led through thick bracken right from the edge of the small car park virtually to the summit of our first Outlying Fell of the day – Great Stickle.

The ascent of Great Stickle through the bracken
The ascent of Great Stickle through the bracken

The ground was firm underfoot and the gradient wasn’t too steep. The view up to the crags ahead was beautiful.

Views from the ascent of Great Stickle
Views from the ascent of Great Stickle

I love the colour of bracken in June and there seemed to be a sea of green in every direction we turned.

Looking back on the ascent of Great Stickle towards Whitfell
Looking back on the ascent of Great Stickle towards Whitfell

We looked back and could pick out the summit of Whitfell quite clearly as we’d hiked that as part of our extended circuit of Devoke Water previously.

Continuing up towards Great Stickle
Continuing up towards Great Stickle

As the trail zigzagged gently through the ferns towards Great Stickle, we were chatting away intently. It was one of those ascents that passed quickly due to great conversation.

The Summit – Great Stickle

The summit cairn of Great Stickle
The summit cairn of Great Stickle

A large cairn marked the summit of great Stickle, five metres south-west of a trig pillar. From here we were treated to an excellent, albeit hazy, view down to Duddon Sands.

The summit cairn of Great Stickle and Stickle Pike in the background
The summit cairn of Great Stickle and Stickle Pike in the background

I also loved the view to the other side, which featured Stickle Pike with a backdrop of higher Lake District mountains. I had the feeling this was going to be a great hill day.

The Summit – Dunnerdale Fells

From Great Stickle we pondered over which route to take to Dunnerdale Fells. We followed a series of small interconnecting paths through the bracken to the edge of this pretty tarn which was teeming with wildlife.

Tarn between Great Stickle and Dunnerdale Fells
Tarn between Great Stickle and Dunnerdale Fells

The ground was firm enough as we were in the midst of a heatwave, but I would imagine this area could be very slushy in poor weather.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Dunnerdale Fells
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Dunnerdale Fells

A very modest cairn of two rocks marked the summit of Dunnerdale Fells.

The Summit – Tarn Hill

From Dunnerdale Fells we headed towards Tarn Hill, weaving around ponds and through bracken, avoiding the crags.

Looking up on the route to Dunnerdale Fells and Tarn Hill
Looking up on the route to Dunnerdale Fells and Tarn Hill

I’m sure the size of the cairn on Tarn Hill made the two stones on Dunnerdale Fells feel woefully inadequate.

The view from here, overlooking a tarn (no surprises there) towards Buck Barrow and Whitefell was stunning.

View from Tarn Hill towards Buck Barrow and Whitfell
View from Tarn Hill towards Buck Barrow and Whitfell

But it couldn’t compete with the view to the other side. Stickle Pike looked so grand up ahead. We were keen to press on.

Laura looking from Tarn Hill towards Stickle Pike
Laura looking from Tarn Hill towards Stickle Pike

The Summit – Stickle Pike

We left the summit of Tarn Hill to the north, all the while Stickle Pike was getting closer and closer. It looked far bigger than its lowly 375m height tag!

Adventurer Nic and Laura en route to Stickle Pike
Adventurer Nic and Laura en route to Stickle Pike

We aimed for the col between the two fells and followed another path through bracken which wound up and over steeper, rockier ground to the summit. And boy was it a handsome summit.

Approaching the summit of Stickle Pike
Approaching the summit of Stickle Pike

Hiking fells like this is one of the reasons I love being a peak bagger. I’d never heard of Stickle Pike prior to walking the Outlying Fells of Lakeland but it’s such a fantastic hill and an absolute must for lovers of Lakeland.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Stickle Pike
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Stickle Pike

We settled down to eat an early lunch at 11:30 am. Laura put us both to shame with her lovely, fresh prawn salad while James and I picked the mould off the bread of our peanut butter sandwiches!

Lunch on Stickle Pike whilst looking over the rest of the route
Lunch on Stickle Pike whilst looking over the rest of the route

At this point in the walk we were so happy. We already had four of the ten fells under our belts but Walna Scar seemed a long way away. We were under no illusions we would be back at the car at tea time. Thank goodness for the late sunsets at this time of year!

Looking to Caw from Stickle Pike
Looking to Caw from Stickle Pike

From our summit vantage point we took the opportunity to scout out the route ahead, looking across Stickle Tarn to the junction at Kiln Bank Cross and on to our next Outlying Fells.

The Nameless Summit – 1183′

We descended to the car park at Kiln Bank Cross and followed the trail to the east, passing a cave in the crag.

Cave in the crag to the left of the trail
Cave in the crag to the left of the trail

From there we took a left fork in the trail, which traversed up the western side of Raven’s Crag.

The trail up the side of Raven's Crag
The trail up the side of Raven’s Crag

This trail led us straight to the nameless summit which Alfred Wainwright, in his book The Outlying Fells of Lakeland, fondly referred to as – nameless summit 1183′.

Looking from the nameless summit towards Caw
Looking from the nameless summit towards Caw

This fell reminded me how must I enjoy bagging the hills that are close to the sea. You get a completely different perspective to the land locked fells in the centre of the Lake District. On a hot day like this was it almost felt like we were abroad!

View to Duddon Sands from Raven's Crag
View to Duddon Sands from Raven’s Crag

It felt unnatural to be walking away from Caw, the 529m hill looming behind me in the photo below, but first we needed to lose some height to bag The Knott, at 284m.

Adventurer Nic on the Nameless Fell with Caw in the background
Adventurer Nic on the Nameless Fell with Caw in the background

The Summit – The Knott

So we continued south along the ridge.

James and Laura heading towards The Knott
James and Laura heading towards The Knott

It was an undulating route, passing over a couple of other tops. Whitfell and Buck Barrow made for an awesome backdrop.

Adventurer Nic on the approach to The Knott
Adventurer Nic on the approach to The Knott

We made it to the top of The Knott and admired our next objective, Caw.

View to Caw and Pikes from The Knott
View to Caw and Pikes from The Knott

The Coniston Fells looked fearsome from this angle. We knew we’d later have to ascend a good chunk of that to reach Walna Scar.

View to the bigger Coniston fells and the direction of Walna Scar, which would be our final Outlier of the day
View to the bigger Coniston fells and the direction of Walna Scar, which would be our final Outlier of the day

The view to Great Stickle, our first Outlier of the day was also stunning.

Looking towards Great Stickle from The Knott
Looking towards Great Stickle from The Knott

And of course we were even closer to the sea.

Duddon Sands from The Knott
Duddon Sands from The Knott

Re-fuelling once more, we had a good giggle during a well earned rest by the summit cairn of The Knott.

Snack and giggles on The Knott
Snack and giggles on The Knott

The Summit – Caw

We retraced our steps for 300m before turning right along the trail, heading north-east towards Jackson Ground on the map.

The path to Caw from The Knott. Walna Scar seemed a long way away at this point
The path to Caw from The Knott. Walna Scar seemed a long way away at this point

This part of the trail was really good underfoot so we made quick progress. We crossed Long Mire Beck and followed the path up to the highest point of the pass before noticing some cairns to the right of the trail. We peeled off the trail and followed the cairns to the foot of Caw, where a steep ascent up the south face was required for 150m.

Around 20m from the summit, an older gentleman passed us with remarkable pace and flexibility. We caught up with him on the summit.

Solo hiker on the summit of Caw
Solo hiker on the summit of Caw

He was a local to south Cumbria, living in Barrow-in-Furness, and after a short chat he ventured off towards his next hill of the day – White Maiden.

The views were simply incredible.

Touching the trig point on Caw
Touching the trig point on Caw

A few friends had recommended Caw as their favourite Outlying Fell of Lakeland so my expectations were high and the views certainly didn’t disappoint!

Views from the trig point of Caw
Views from the trig point of Caw

There were OUTSTANDING views to the highest peaks of the Lake District including Scafell Pike, Pillar, Great End and on to Esk Pike, Bow Fell, Crinkle Crags, Pike O’Blisco and all the Coniston fells – Great Carrs, Swirl How, Dow Crag, Coniston Old Man. In the foreground – Harter Fell and Hard Knott also stood out.

View to Duddon Sands from the trig point of Caw
View to Duddon Sands from the trig point of Caw

The views off to the other side were striking for different reasons. A sea view and then Black Combe and a number of other familiar outliers from trips gone by. What a treat.

The Summit – Pikes

Laura decided to leave us at this point, so made her own way back to the car from Caw. James and I continued on, heading north-east towards Pikes.

The uninterrupted views of the Lake District giants were heavenly.

Leaving Caw in the direction of Pikes
Leaving Caw in the direction of Pikes

It seemed like it was mostly downhill towards Pikes, and there were now only two summits between us and Walna Scar.

The summit of Pikes
The summit of Pikes

A rocky outcrop marked the summit of Pikes.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Pikes, looking towards Walna Scar
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Pikes, looking towards Walna Scar

The Summit – Green Pikes

The amble across to Green Pikes was trouble-free and joyous.

Adventurer Nic on the hike towards Green Pikes
Adventurer Nic on the hike towards Green Pikes

We were now heading directly towards the big mountains in distance and it was difficult to concentrate on where we were putting our feet because of the distraction of the awesome scenery.

Adventurer Nic in awe of the scene between Pikes and Green Pikes
Adventurer Nic in awe of the scene between Pikes and Green Pikes

Green Pikes was my favourite place to photograph of the day. There is no cairn on the summit but the views are out of this world.

Adventurer Nic showing her love for Green Pikes. One more fell to go, Walna Scar
Adventurer Nic showing her love for Green Pikes. One more fell to go, Walna Scar

The Summit – Walna Scar

And just like that we had one Outlying Fell remaining! Walna Scar here we come.

Ruins of quarry buildings on the way to Walna Scar
Ruins of quarry buildings on the way to Walna Scar

We descended off Green Pikes and headed for the wide track known as Walna Scar Road. The path led us past a series of old ruined quarry buildings. What awesome views they’d have if you could stay in them I pondered.

Ascending Walna Scar Road
Ascending Walna Scar Road

The track wound its way up Walna Scar Side and to a crossroads at the col between Walna Scar and Brown Pike. We turned right to head south up and onto the summit.

Approaching the summit of Walna Scar, our last Outlying Fell of the day
Approaching the summit of Walna Scar, our last Outlying Fell of the day

The top was marked by a cairn and overlooked what appeared to be the full length of Coniston Water.

Views from Walna Scar over Coniston Water
Views from Walna Scar over Coniston Water

Looking back, the zigzag path up Brown Pike and on to Dow Crag was so clear as visibility was great.

The summit of Walna Scar looking to Brown Pike
The summit of Walna Scar looking to Brown Pike

We celebrated the milestone, as we were now 40% through Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland and we’d already ticked off the two highest fells – Walna Scar and Black Combe.

Adventurer Nic celebrating hiking the highest of the Outlying Fells of Lakeland - Walna Scar
Adventurer Nic celebrating hiking the highest of the Outlying Fells of Lakeland – Walna Scar

The Long Descent of Walna Scar

Thinking about the long walk back to the car, we left the summit and retraced our steps back to the ruined quarry buildings, before continuing through a gate down Walna Scar Road, heading north-west towards the base of the valley, which contained the Tarn Beck and the village of Seathwaite. We filled our water bottles from the stream and couldn’t quite quench our thirst on what felt like the hottest day of the year so far.

Views to Harter Fell from the long walk back to the car after Walna Scar
Views to Harter Fell from the long walk back to the car after Walna Scar

We reached the road at the bottom and walked along it for almost 2km under the blissful shade of the large trees that lined the street. The view to Harter Fell from the valley was beautiful, surrounded by woodland and quintessentially English dry stone walls.

Another Ascent Before Finishing the Walk

We joined a path which led gently uphill back towards the Kiln Bank Cross car park for around 3.5km.

Looking back over stunning views of Lakeland
Looking back over stunning views of Lakeland

As we regained 200m of height the views opened up behind us once more.

Heading back towards the foot of Stickle Pike
Heading back towards the foot of Stickle Pike

By this point we were very tired and a bit low on energy so some high calorie sugary snacks were on the menu to perk us up.

We made it back to Kiln Bank Cross car park and made a beeline for Stickle Tarn. From there we followed the trail beside Hare Hall Beck, laughing as we spotted two Herdwick sheep in the middle of a swampy tarn having a cool down.

Two sheep swimming in the middle of this swampy tarn
Two sheep swimming in the middle of this swampy tarn

We were back on the bracken lined trails for the remainder of the walk, bypassing Great Stickle and picking up the original route of ascent which led these two weary hikers back to the car.

James Forrest following the trails through bracken back to the car
James Forrest following the trails through bracken back to the car

Wrapping Up our hike up Walna Scar, Caw, Stickle Pike and Friends

What a day! 26km and over 1,000m of ascent on the hottest day of the year probably wasn’t the best idea but the views certainly warranted completing this walk on a clear day.

Our next outing would be Cold Fell and Ponsonby Fell in the western Lake District.

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist, Wainwright ‘Compleator’ and is hiking her local Outlying Fells of Lakeland in the wake of the corona virus pandemic. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.