Faulds Brow

View from the summit of Faulds Brow, a Wainwright Outlying Fell in the northern Lake District

Route Introduction

Faulds Brow is one of Alfred Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland. It is situated on the northern edge of the Lake District National Park. This route card suggests a great route for someone peak bagging the Outlying Fells of Lakeland.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Tuesday 2nd June 2020. This was Outlier number 16 of 116 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag this outlying fell too.

Faulds Brow Route Stats

Fells: Faulds Brow (344m)

Total Distance: 4.25km / 2.64miles

Total Ascent: 130m / 427ft

Approx Walk Time: 1 hour

Grid Reference Start: NY 308397

Faulds Brow Route Report

The Lead Up

The previous day we’d had a hot and sweaty walk up Clints Crags in the north west Lake District, but the weather was about to turn. A long sunny heat wave was about to give way to stormy and much cooler climes.

My boyfriend James and I decided to head for Faulds Brow while visibility was still half descent. It did however look dark and threatening so a rain jacket came with me. Optimism gave way to realism…this is Cumbria after all.

The Ascent

We parked up in the small car park just outside Whelpo and hiked uphill along the road to start the walk. Up ahead we could see a bunch of tiny bunny rabbits, hopping in and out of the gorse bushes on either side of the road.

Sign post to Whelpo on the T junction
Sign post to Whelpo on the T junction

We arrived at a T junction in the road and hit the hillside, where a faint footpath led uphill in a northerly direction towards the summit of Faulds Brow.

View over to Skiddaw from the ascent of Faulds Brow
View over to Skiddaw from the ascent of Faulds Brow

Views of the triangular summit of Skiddaw opened up behind us as we ascended gently on grassy terrain.

The Summit – Faulds Brow

Adventurer Nic standing at the summit of Faulds Brow, looking towards Carrock Fell and High Pike
Adventurer Nic standing at the summit of Faulds Brow, looking towards Carrock Fell and High Pike

At the summit we were greeted by a large cairn. The most recognisable peaks on the skyline were Carrock Fell, High Pike and Skiddaw.

Faulds Brow is 344m in height and is the most northerly summit of Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland. It’s most definitely a ‘hill of two sides’ – one side being the mountainous panorama of the Back O’Skiddaw fells and the other featuring two ugly television masts.

The Descent

As the sky began to bruise, we headed down from the summit of Faulds Brow to the east, walking past a small car park, before turning south down a track towards a farm.

There was a right of way through the farm but there was a polite sign stating that the residents were self isolating due to being vulnerable to COVID-19 so we were deterred from venturing further. Instead we turned right and headed through the fields.

This came with its own challenges. There were cattle with calves in the next field. James wanted to turn back but I was keen to continue towards the stile in the next wall cautiously. The cows eventually lost interest and moved away, giving us the freedom we needed to escape the field quietly and calmly.

Descending Faulds Brow through farm land
Descending Faulds Brow through farm land

We then descended south down towards the road we’d started on. Passing through a gate and walking right around a copse of trees, we made it back onto the road.

We saw one of the rabbits again. This time on the grass beside the bushes so I snapped a photograph. So cute!

Bunny in the gorse bushes
Bunny in the gorse bushes

Wrapping Up

This was a great short walk on the far northern edge of the Lake District. Faulds Brow is seldom walked by visitors of the Lake District National Park, who are lured by the bigger mountains, the lakes and the picturesque towns and villages, but this fell still has a lot to offer, especially to those who have hiked all the Wainwrights.

Next up on our Wainwright’s Outlying Fells agenda was Watch Hill.

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist, Wainwright ‘Compleator’ and is hiking her local Outlying Fells of Lakeland in the wake of the corona virus pandemic. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.

Clints Crags

Wonderful views from Clints Crags towards Skiddaw and Bassenthwaite Lake

Route Introduction

Clints Crags is one of Alfred Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland. It is situated on the northwestern edge of the Lake District National Park. This route card suggests a fantastic route for someone peak bagging the Outlying Fells of Lakeland.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Monday 1st June 2020. This was Outlier number 15 of 116 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag this outlying fell too.

Clints Crags Route Stats

Fells: Clints Crags (245m)

Total Distance: 5.25km / 3.26miles

Total Ascent: 90m / 295ft

Approx Walk Time: 1.5 hours

Grid Reference Start: NY 149347

Clints Crags Route Report

The Lead Up

Cumbria was in the grip of a heat wave on the 1st June 2020. I decided to walk Clints Crags one hot Monday afternoon with my boyfriend James after a busy day behind our laptop screens. The previous day we’d walked 12 fells south of Eskdale in an epic 20km peak bagging hike, so at 5.25km, this would be a much more relaxed affair.

It only took ten minutes to drive to Blindcrake from James’s house in Cockermouth.

The Ascent

Tree-lined path to start the walk

We parked up on the road and set off hand in hand, walking north-east out of the picturesque village.

It was a perfect day – blue skies, bright sunshine with a perfect smattering of fluffy clouds.

After only a short distance of road walking we turned right onto a footpath following a finger post.

This led us into a dense tree-lined alley which ascended gently in an easterly direction.

At a gate at the end of the passage, we looked out onto the open grassy hillside.

There were plenty of cows in the field so we took our time, stepping gingerly and giving them a wide berth.

We could see the Clints Crags summit in front of us as we made our way through the field.

A faint path appeared and we followed it before pausing beside the wall that ran along the right hand side of the field and gawped at the glorious views across the northwestern Lake District.

The break in the wall close to the summit of Clints Crags, a Wainwright Outlying Fell in the Lake District, overlooking Bassenthwaite Lake
The break in the wall close to the summit of Clints Crags, a Wainwright Outlying Fell in the Lake District, overlooking Bassenthwaite Lake

A wonderfully deep blue Bassenthwaite Lake looked beautiful in the valley with the giant of Skiddaw looming over it.

The Summit – Clints Crags

We peeled off the path to the left, beside a very small pocket of quarried land to summit Clints Crags.

The summit of Clints Crags in the Lake District
The summit of Clints Crags in the Lake District

A very small cairn marked the summit of this Outlying Fell of Lakeland. At a modest 245m, the view from the summit of Clints Crags was wonderful.

The Descent

We left the summit of Clints Crags and followed the path down past a limestone pavement.

A stretch of limestone pavement sat atop an escarpment. Moss covered the limestone slabs. It has been declared a Site of Special Scientific Interest for conservation as it supports a wide ranging number of rare calcareous species of flora and fauna.

The limestone pavement on Clints Crags
The limestone pavement on Clints Crags

From here we descended further to a ruined farm building.

The ruin at the foot of Clints Crags
The ruin at the foot of Clints Crags

The views kept getting better and better! We looked across at Skiddaw, Ullock Pike and Dodd, each decreasing in size as the land fell away to the shores of Bassenthwaite Lake. It was a lovely new perspective from which to appreciate these fells.

Adventurer Nic descending Clints Crags
Adventurer Nic descending Clints Crags

We descended further down to Willie White’s well – where water rises from beneath the limestone headwall. Willie White’s well has been marked on maps since the late 1800s.

Adventurer Nic going through the gate close to Willie White's Well on the Clints Crags walk
Adventurer Nic going through the gate close to Willie White’s Well on the Clints Crags walk

We joined a gated lane and walked along it before making a ‘u’ turn at the far end of the route.

Views on the descent of Clints Crags in the Lake District
Views on the descent of Clints Crags in the Lake District

Avoiding some more cows, we followed the right of way through fields. A series of wide, flat sections of field were each separated by a short drop as they sat like shelves on the hillside.

Lambs in the shade of a tree
Lambs in the shade of a tree

We walked west, with Thackray Woods now above us, before views to Isel Hall opened up below us in the valley. Parts of Isel Hall date back to 1400.

Views from Clints Crags to Isel
Views from Clints Crags to Isel

In the final large field, a wall led us back to the gate where the car was parked.

Wrapping Up

Due to the weather we were so thirsty when we reached the car, we downed a litre of water each and made the short drive home feeling like we’d had a wonderful hour or so in the rare sunny Cumbrian countryside.

Next on the Wainwright’s Outlying Fells peak bagging agenda was Faulds Brow.

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist, Wainwright ‘Compleator’ and is hiking her local Outlying Fells of Lakeland in the wake of the corona virus pandemic. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.

Extended Circuit of Devoke Water

Adventurer Nic approaching the summit of Woodend Height on the Extended Circuit of Devoke Water hiking route

Devoke Water Route Introduction

The Circuit of Devoke Water is a classic horseshoe featured in Alfred Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland. The original route takes in 6 outlier fells in the south west of the Lake District National Park. This route card incorporates and additional 6 hills and is a fantastic route for someone peak bagging the Outlying Fells of Lakeland.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Sunday 31st May 2020. These were Outlier numbers 3 to 14 of 116 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag these outlying fells too.

Extended Circuit of Devoke Water Route Stats

Fells: Rough Crag (319m), Water Crag (305m), White Pike (442m), The Knott (331m), Stainton Pike (498m), Whitfell (573m), Burn Moor (543m), Buck Barrow (549m), Kinmont Buck Barrow (535m), Yoadcastle (494m), Woodend Height (489m) and Seat How (311m)

Total Distance: 20.4km / 12.68miles

Total Ascent: 600m / 1,969ft

Approx Walk Time: 6 hours

Grid Reference Start: SD 171977

Extended Circuit of Devoke Water Route Report

The Lead Up

A day earlier we’d hiked Flat Fell and Dent, the first two Wainwright Outlying Fells of Lakeland on our peak bagging list, but it was time for something a bit more juicy.

The walk started at a small car park just off the Austhwaite Brow. There were a few cars there when James and I arrived at mid-morning but there were still some free spaces.

The weather forecast for the day was glorious. Sun cream and water were required in large quantities.

The Ascent

We set off in a south-westerly direction along a wide track in the direction of Devoke Water.

Views as we ascended Rough Crag, the first Outlying fell of the day
Views as we ascended Rough Crag, the first Outlying fell of the day

At an obvious scar in the grassy bank on the right hand side we peeled off the track, following the faint path which guided us gradually over grassy terrain. The views back across Eskdale were fantastic, right from the off.

Views from the ascent of Rough Crag
Views from the ascent of Rough Crag

Devoke Water, which was a bright royal blue in the gorgeous sunshine, is normally popular with anglers but there were none that day.

The ground was dry from the recent warm weather and we soon reached the summit of Rough Crag.

The Summit – Rough Crag

Rough Crags's summit cairn, with views down to Devoke Water
Rough Crags’s summit cairn, with views down to Devoke Water

Out to the west was the large expanse of the Irish Sea and the faint outline of the Isle of Man. The small hump of Water Crag, our second Outlying fell of the day, can be seen clearly, behind the cairn of Rough Crag, in the above photograph.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Rough Crag
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Rough Crag

The Summit – Water Crag

After a short pause, we walked south-west to Water Crag, the second hill in the Circuit of Devoke Water.

To get there, we followed a faint path over grassy terrain, descending and re-ascending a mere 50m between the two fells. I noted that this was in stark contrast to the 600m cols between the giants of the Munro mountains of Scotland that we hiked the previous summer.

View from the summit of Water Crag
View from the summit of Water Crag

Water Crag had sea views that were even better than the panorama from Rough Crag. The sea was a lovely bright shade of blue.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Water Crag
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Water Crag

The Summit – White Pike

From Water Crag we dropped down to the south-west, through wet grass that is probably quite boggy after a spate of wet weather but was fairly firm for us. We aimed for the western edge of the tarn where we planned to cross Linbeck Gill and head up the fells on the south side of Devoke Water, starting with White Pike.

James on the ascent of White Pike with Devoke Water in the distance
James on the ascent of White Pike with Devoke Water in the distance

We started hiking uphill on the other side looking for faint paths but there was nothing but a few misleading sheep trods. We paused for a drink and a snack and identified all the fells we could see from this vantage point, from Whin Rigg in the north, we cast our eyes right across the skyline of bigger fells over to Crinkle Crags.

Setting back off walking, we pushed to the summit of White Pike.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of White Pike
Adventurer Nic on the summit of White Pike

The top of White Pike was rocky and we were greeted by a slim columnar cairn.

Views from the summit of White Pike towards Bowfell
Views from the summit of White Pike towards Bowfell

The Summit – The Knott

From the summit of White Pike we left the usual trail for the Circuit of Devoke Water and made our first diversion.

We dropped down, picking our way around the crags and boulders on this side of the hill. We avoided the steepest parts by heading south around the rocks.

After reaching the grassy col we walked over a small hill which led to The Knott, our fourth outlying fell.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of The Knott
Adventurer Nic on the summit of The Knott

We had our lunch here – cheese and pickle sandwiches. A game James and I often played whilst sitting in front of a Lakeland view was to survey the scene and select which cottage out of the valley you’d most like to live in. On this occasion, James picked what looked like a stately home, while I opted for a more modest white washed cottage close to woodland. There were no prizes associated with this game of course, we could never afford a cottage in the Lake District National Park, but nobody can stop us dreaming. We admired the views a little longer, with the exception of Sellafield nuclear power station, which was visible to the north west.

The Summit – Stainton Pike

After lunch we headed off to the south east, picking our way towards next fell – Stainton Pike. Tussocky, hard, grassy, ankle-breaking lumps slowed us down somewhat. I was grateful I’d opted for boots.

The ground then turned a little bit boggy. We crossed Stainton Beck at the point where it forked, before crossing a fence at the most appropriate point. We continued uphill following a grassy rake to the left of the summit of Stainton Pike.

View from the summit of Stainton Pike
View from the summit of Stainton Pike

Once we’d gained the ridge, we turned right to head south west to the summit.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Stainton Pike
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Stainton Pike

The Summit – Whitfell

From the summit of Stainton Pike, we dropped off summit heading for Whitfell, or Whit Fell, if you use the spelling Alfred Wainwright adopted in his guide book.

We crossed the fence by Holehouse Tarn and picked up a faint path which led to the top of Whitfell.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Whitfell
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Whitfell

Whitfell’s summit was marked with a trio of features – a very large cairn, an adjoining wind shelter and a trig pillar.

View from Whifell's large summit cairn towards the trig pillar
View from Whifell’s large summit cairn towards the trig pillar

The Summit – Burn Moor

From the summit of Whitfell, we followed a faint path over grassy terrain to the rather lacklustre Burn Moor – the seventh fell on this extended circuit of Devoke Water. It was quite rounded and featureless in comparison to its neighbours, but it made a nice change.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Burn Moor
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Burn Moor

From Burn Moor, a view opened up of Duddon Sands in the south east.

The Summit – Buck Barrow

From Burn Moor we followed a faint path to Buck Barrow, our eighth outlying fell of the day.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Buckbarrow on the extended circuit of Devoke Water hike
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Buckbarrow on the extended circuit of Devoke Water hike

In stark comparison to Burn Moor, Buck Barrow was rocky on top, but there was plenty of space between the rocks to walk up to the summit without any scrambling.

View towards Kinmont Buckbarrow from Buckbarrow
View towards Kinmont Buckbarrow from Buckbarrow

We looked across to the west at our next target – Kinmont Buck Barrow.

The Summit – Kinmont Buck Barrow

We descended to find a large wall split Buck Barrow and Kinmont Buck Barrow, so we headed for a large gap in the wall before ascending.

Views from the summit of Kinmont Buckbarrow
Views from the summit of Kinmont Buckbarrow

It wasn’t long before we’d reached the large cairn that marked the summit of our ninth outlying fell. It was also the furthest point from the car where we’d started the walk.

Views from the summit of Kinmont Buckbarrow
Views from the summit of Kinmont Buckbarrow

Black Combe was visible from here.

The Summit – Yoadcastle

We returned to the same gap in the dry stone wall and followed it north. We bypassed the bulk of Burn Moor and walked along a faint path that led all the way back to Whitfell.

By this point in the walk we’d noticed that there had been skylarks above us for much of the walk. In fact, they were the only other living thing we’d seen all day! Their melodic chirping was a great soundtrack to the walk.

As we re-ascended Whitfell from the south we passed another couple – these would be the only other people we encountered on the whole 20km route.

We descended back to Holehouse Tarn and then headed for Yoadcastle, keeping the crags on our left. We weaved around a couple of craggy tops before heading up onto the summit, officially rejoining the original Circuit of Devoke Water route from here on in.

Adventurer Nic sitting on the summit of Yoadcastle, part of the Circuit of Devoke Water walk
Adventurer Nic sitting on the summit of Yoadcastle, part of the Circuit of Devoke Water walk

Whilst on Yoadcastle, we scouted out two fells that we’d return to and hike another day – Hesk Fell and The Pike.

The Summit – Woodend Height

We left the summit of Yoadcastle and made our way with ease to our penultimate hill of the day and boy was it worth the wait! Woodend Height soon became my favourite fell of the extended circuit of Devoke Water.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Woodend Height
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Woodend Height

The summit offered the best view of the trip – with at least 16 Wainwrights visible to the north, over Devoke Water – starting with the Wasdale fells and extending east, it was a feast for the eyes.

View over Devoke Water from the summit of Woodend Height
View over Devoke Water from the summit of Woodend Height

Woodend Height really offered a stunning panorama. I didn’t want to leave!

The Summit – Seat How

We headed down over pathless but firm grassy terrain to the valley bottom again. Seat How appeared to be a little rocky lump in the middle distance.

View over Devoke Water as we approached Seat How
View over Devoke Water as we approached Seat How

Seat How appeared craggy on all sides but we headed to its eastern side where it was possible to weave easily up through the rocks.

View of Devoke Water from the summit of Seat How
View of Devoke Water from the summit of Seat How

The view from the summit was lovely. We’d now appreciated Devoke Water from every possible angle, completing the full extended circuit.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Seat How, our final Outlying Fell of the day
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Seat How, our final Outlying Fell of the day

Extended Circuit of Devoke Water Descent

We dropped down from Seat How, again finding the best way off to the east, before heading around back to the track where we’d started the day that morning.

A short walk to the car and that was that. 12 of Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland in the bag!

Wrapping Up our Devoke Water Hike

Burnt shoulders and big smiles! That pretty much summed up the day as we stretched our tired muscles back at the car. The Lake District was truly on top form and we were thankful we were there to appreciate it.

What next? Clints Crags beckoned – this would be our next Outlying Fell.

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist, Wainwright ‘Compleator’ and is hiking her local Outlying Fells of Lakeland in the wake of the corona virus pandemic. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.

Flat Fell and Dent

Adventurer Nic walking on the summit of Flat Fell, a Wainwright Outlying Fell in the Lake District

Route Introduction

Flat Fell and Dent are two of Alfred Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland. They’re situated on the western edge of the Lake District National Park. This route card suggests a fantastic route for someone peak bagging the Outlying Fells of Lakeland.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Saturday 30th May 2020. These were Outlier numbers 1 and 2 of 116 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag these outlying fells too.

Flat Fell and Dent Route Stats

Fells: Flat Fell (272m) and Dent (346m)

Total Distance: 8.2km / 5.09miles

Total Ascent: 390m / 1,280ft

Approx Walk Time: 2.5 hours

Grid Reference Start: NY 031144

Flat Fell and Dent Route Report

The Lead Up

My boyfriend James and I discussed easing ourselves back into hill walking gently after a long absence during the corona virus pandemic, where we stayed at home alongside the rest of the nation during late March, April and early May of 2020.

We have both ‘compleated’ rounds of the Wainwrights so Alfred Wainwright’s Outlying Fells of Lakeland seemed like the perfect way to recommence hill walking whilst remaining sensitive to the pandemic restrictions and guidelines.

Based out of Cockermouth, we started with the western and northern fells, prioritising those with parking outside of the national park and away from residents.

We selected Flat Fell and Dent as our first two fells, for a sunny afternoon hike.

We parked the car in a large layby in the Wath Brow area of Cleator Moor and headed north east over a bridge to start the walk.

The Ascent

Views on the ascent of Flat Fell
Views on the ascent of Flat Fell

The initial part of the walk took us along the tarmacked road before we turned right to head southeast up Nannycatch Road.

Views on the ascent of Flat Fell
Views on the ascent of Flat Fell

At the end of the road, we followed a finger post signed for Nannycatch Gate before heading up the grassy hillside towards the summit of Flat Fell.

The Summit – Flat Fell

We reached the summit in glorious sunshine.

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Flat Fell in the Lake District National Park
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Flat Fell in the Lake District National Park

The summit of Flat Fell is marked by an elaborate cairn.

Summit of Flat Fell
Summit of Flat Fell

You can clearly see the Wainwright of Grike from the summit, and beyond to Great Borne and Grasmoor beyond that.

Linking the Fells

We followed Alfred Wainwright’s advice from his book – The Outlying Fells of Lakeland – and descended down in a south easterly direction.

James Forrest on the descent of Flat Fell towards Nannycatch Gate
James Forrest on the descent of Flat Fell towards Nannycatch Gate

The terrain steepens here as you descend through sparse bracken to the valley bottom. Aim for Nannycatch Gate which is visible from above.

James Forrest pauses just above Nannycatch Gate
James Forrest pauses just above Nannycatch Gate

We passed through Nannycatch Gate and headed down the wide track.

James Forrest crosses a stream in the picturesque valley bottom between Flat Fell and Dent
James Forrest crosses a stream in the picturesque valley bottom between Flat Fell and Dent

There are useful wooden footbridges over the small streams.

Walking through the valley, linking Flat Fell with Dent
Walking through the valley, linking Flat Fell with Dent

The valley was really quiet and beautiful as we walked alongside Kirk Beck.

We started climbing again at the side of Raven Crag following a clear path. We sat for a while on the slopes and had five minutes truly re-connecting with nature.

Views from the ascent of Dent
Views from the ascent of Dent

Having been cooped up for so long due to the pandemic we wanted to really appreciate being in the hills again. We watched the sheep grazing, a butterfly landing on the ground beside us, a bee buzzing behind us and we admired the woodland beside Lagget Beck that rose up in front of us. What a joy it was to be back.

Views from the ascent of Dent
Views from the ascent of Dent

We recommenced our walk and passed through two gates. A the second, we turned around and realised Scafell Pike and Scafell were now visible behind us. Two giants of the Lake District (the highest two points in England).

Looking through the cotton grass to Scafell Pike and Scafell
Looking through the cotton grass to Scafell Pike and Scafell

The Summit – Dent

Gaining the summit plateau of Dent, we first passed a small cairn, which indicated the true summit (the highest point at 352m).

The highest point on Dent
The highest point on Dent

But Wainwright favours the north west summit further along (at 346m), marked by a much bigger cairn.

Adventurer Nic approaching the Wainwright summit of Dent
Adventurer Nic approaching the Wainwright summit of Dent

The Descent

We enjoyed sea views on the descent.

Looking towards the Isle of Man
Looking towards the Isle of Man

We could see the hazy outline of the Isle of Man rising up out of the water in the distance.

Adventurer Nic descending Dent
Adventurer Nic descending Dent

Sellafield nuclear power station was visible on one side. I preferred the view to Criffel in Dumfries and Galloway on the other.

We descended until the grass gave way to woodland.

Woodland on the descent of Dent in Cumbria
Woodland on the descent of Dent in Cumbria

Passing through the woodland, we reached the road, which led back to the bridge at the beginning of the walk.

Wrapping Up

The bridge at the end of the walk
The bridge at the end of the walk

All in all it was a great afternoon hike. Next on the list was something a little more challenging, 12 Outlying Fells of Lakeland situated south of Devoke Water.

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist, Wainwright ‘Compleator’ and is hiking her local Outlying Fells of Lakeland in the wake of the corona virus pandemic. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.