Camban Bothy Munro Route

Adventurer Nic walking down from the summit of Ciste Dhubh down the north west ridge at sunset
Hiking over the Three Brothers on the three-day Camban Bothy Munro Route
Hiking over the Three Brothers on the three-day Camban Bothy Munro Route

Camban Bothy Munro Route Introduction

This is a multi-day Munro bagging route using Camban Bothy as a base for 12 mountains in the areas north of Glen Shiel and Glen Affric, including the Five Sisters of Kintail and the Three Brothers.

The 12 Munros featured in this route are – Sgurr Fhuaran, Sgurr na Carnach, Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe, Saileag, Sgurr a’ Bhealaich Dheirg, Aonach Meadhoin, Ciste Dhubh, Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan, Mullach na Dheiragain, An Socach, Mullach Fraoch-choire and A’ Chralaig. This route card explains the quickest way of getting to all 12 summits for a peak bagger in a single outing of 3 days.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Sunday 7th July 2019 as part of her Munro Bagging Challenge. These were Munro numbers 132 to 143 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag these Munros too.

Camban Bothy Munro Route Stats

Mountains: Sgurr Fhuaran (1,067 m), Sgurr na Carnach (1,002 m), Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe (1,027 m), Saileag (956 m), Sgurr a’ Bhealaich Dheirg (1,036 m), Aonach Meadhoin (1,001 m), Ciste Dhubh (979 m), Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan (1,151 m), Mullach na Dheiragain (982 m), An Socach (921 m), Mullach Fraoch-choire (1,102 m) and A’ Chralaig (1,120 m)

Total Distance: 62.4km / 38.77miles

Total Ascent: 3,800m / 12,467ft

Approx Walk Time: 3 days

Grid Reference Start: NG 945202

Grid Reference End: NH 091121

Camban Bothy Munro Route Report

The Lead Up

We woke up on the campsite of Faichemard Farm Touring, Caravan and Camping Site for the fifth and final time. It had been a good place for us to base our tent for the week and we’d hiked a total of 11 Munros whilst there.

We decamped in one of the biggest midge swarms we’d experienced on the challenge so far. I waited in the car while James took the tent down. He then got in with midges clinging to his entire body. It was a nightmare! I sped off the campsite with the windows down to try and get rid of them all, while James slapped himself repeatedly. If it wasn’t for the midges it would have been the perfect site, really quiet and great facilities. It’s a shame the midges liked to make us a prisoner of our tent.

We arrived in Morvich and parked in a small visitors car park. We didn’t plan on returning to the car for four days.

Day 1 Getting Going

It was 10:40am and we’d left the car a bit later than planned. We knew we’d have a big day ahead, with seven Munros on the agenda. It was only yesterday when we were on the opposite side of they valley bagging the seven Munros on the South Glen Shiel Ridge!

Loch Duich from the initial ascent, with the reflection of clouds and sky in the still water
Loch Duich from the initial ascent, with the reflection of clouds and sky in the still water

14 Munros in two days was quite an ask, but we were feeling strong and the conditions were perfect. Loch Duich was so still it acted as a mirror for the fluffy white clouds and blue sky above.

Day 1 Ascent

Adventurer Nic on the ascent of Sgurr Fhuaran with Loch Duich behind her
Adventurer Nic on the ascent of Sgurr Fhuaran with Loch Duich behind her

We started the ascent on a clear path that cut steeply up the hill side, ultimately emerging at the start of a magnificent ridge.

James Forrest overlooking Coire na h-Uaighe on the ascent to Sgurr Fhuaran
James Forrest overlooking Coire na h-Uaighe on the ascent to Sgurr Fhuaran

The Coire na h-Uaighe was vast and framed by a rocky ridge, it was a dramatic setting and we were excited for the walk ahead.

Lunch on Beinn Bhuidhe en route to Sgurr Fhuaran

We headed south and continued uphill to the summit of Beinn Bhuidhe.

Beinn Bhuidhe is not a Munro, Corbett or any other classification and yet it had awesome views of the ridge ahead.

The perfect place to stop and enjoy lunch.

The bulk of Sgurr Fhuaran, our first Munro on the Camban Bothy Munro Route, looked really imposing from this angle.

Lunch consisted of wraps with a Nutella filling, plus sprinkled coconut bites.

We’d purchased a 1kg bag of crunchy coconut bites from Costco and they were so versatile!

We added them to wraps but also ate them loose as a snack.

The ridge wasn’t challenging, it was just fun! It often looked dicey but never actually was.

James Forrest descending Beinn Bhuidhe towards Sgurr Fhuaran
James Forrest descending Beinn Bhuidhe towards Sgurr Fhuaran

From this early vantage point we could enjoy views of the Cuillin ridge on Skye to the west as well as the Torridon hills to the north.

Views over to Loch Duich and the distant Cuillin Munros
Views over to Loch Duich and the distant Cuillin Munros

Given the fact we’d eaten lunch before even getting close to the first Munro of seven meant that we knew at this point that we were in for a late finish. It helped that we knew a welcoming bothy awaited us.

Camban Bothy Munro Route: Day 1 Summits

Sgurr Fhuaran

Those wanting to hike the traditional Five Sisters of Kintail route will first summit Sgurr nan Saighead, but we skirted around the edge of this Corbett and headed straight for the first Munro of the route, Sgurr Fhuaran.

On the summit of Sgurr Fhuaran we met a really friendly woman called Anne Marie. She was from Inverness and out hiking with her friend. Anne Marie took the below photo of us on the summit of Sgurr Fhuaran and we chatted for a good twenty minutes. I was astounded to discover that she was on 281 of 282 Munros! She was in no rush to ‘compleat’ though.

Adventurer Nic and James Forrest on the summit of Sgurr Fhuaran, the first of the Camban Bothy Munros
Adventurer Nic and James Forrest on the summit of Sgurr Fhuaran, the first of the Camban Bothy Munros

I asked which Munro she had left and it was Ben More on the Isle of Mull (which had been our first)! She said that one day she’d make it over to Mull to finish her Munro round but it had never felt like the right time.

Instead, she was content hiking her favourite Munros again and again, and that was what she was doing on the Five Sisters of Kintail that day.

Anne Marie insisted that I take her number and said to call if ever we needed a bed, a shower and a meal in the Inverness area during our challenge. A gem of a woman! We now follow each other on Instagram and (to date) she’s still content on 281.

Sgurr na Carnach

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Sgurr na Carnach, the second of the Camban Bothy Munros

By now we were seriously behind schedule and we were certain to finish with head torches in the darkness.

I did love meeting people and hearing their stories during our Munro round though so I don’t regret taking the time to get to know Anne Marie.

We didn’t need to take her up on her offer in the end but she reminded me of it multiple times in the following months.

From Sgurr Fhuaran we headed south down the ridge towards Sgurr na Carnach. The second peak of the Camban Bothy Munro Route.

With the col between them being over 850m it didn’t feel like too much work to get to the second Munro summit.

Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe

We realised that once we were high on the ridge, the summits seemed to come thick and fast. Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe was next. From Sgurr na Canarch we descended south to Bealach na Craoibhe, before turning east up to the summit of Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe.

Adventurer Nic and James Forrest in a selfie on the summit of Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe, the third of the Camban Bothy Munros
Adventurer Nic and James Forrest in a selfie on the summit of Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe, the third of the Camban Bothy Munros

Saileag

After posing for a selfie we left Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe and continued along the ridge.

The cairn marking the summit of Saileag, a Munro in the Scottish Highlands

We continued east to Sgurr nan Spainteach, over Beinn Odhar and down to Bealach an Lapain.

If you were just walking the Five Sisters of Kintail, you’d most likely make your way down to the road at this point, but we needed to continue to the Three Brothers.

At 725m, the bealach was the lowest we’d been since before the first Munro.

But luckily Saileag was the smallest Munro of the day so far so the pull up to the summit didn’t feel too taxing.

Saileag had a very unique summit cairn, featuring long rocks balanced on each other, defying gravity.

We took the opportunity to have a short rest on the summit. The views were simply magnificent. There was something about the light that day that made the landscape look so dreamy and inviting.

James Forrest relaxing on the summit of Saileag, our fourth Munro of the day
James Forrest relaxing on the summit of Saileag, our fourth Munro of the day

James admired the view over Sgurr na Sgine and The Saddle, with Ladhar Bheinn and even the hills on the distant Isle of Rum visible in the distance. The Cuillin ridge can be seen on the right of the above picture.

Sgurr a’ Bhealaich Dheirg

Views as we descended Saileag
Views as we descended Saileag

We admired the Munros on the south side of Glen Shiel as we left the summit of Saileag and headed to Sgurr a’ Bhealaich Dheirg.

James Forrest on the summit of Sgurr a' Bhealaich Dheirg, our fifth of the Camban Bothy Munros
James Forrest on the summit of Sgurr a’ Bhealaich Dheirg, our fifth of the Camban Bothy Munros

To reach the summit of this Munro, you must leave the main ridge, and head northeast along a short, sharp ridge. A large, impressive cairn marks the summit.

James knelt down in the shelter of some larger rocks to boil the water for our freeze dried meals on the stove while I walked on ahead.

Adventurer Nic starting the descent from Sgurr a' Bhealaich Dheirg en route to Aonach Meadhoin - the day was coming to a close and we planned to descend to Camban Bothy
Adventurer Nic starting the descent from Sgurr a’ Bhealaich Dheirg en route to Aonach Meadhoin – the day was coming to a close

I headed south east along the main ridge towards the col between Sgurr a’ Bhealaich Dheirg and Aonach Meadhoin.

James poured the boiling water into the food pouches, tucked them into his jacket and walked back along the ridge and down to join me.

James Forrest descending Sgurr a' Bhealaich Dheirg towards Aonach Meadhoin
James Forrest descending Sgurr a’ Bhealaich Dheirg towards Aonach Meadhoin

Aonach Meadhoin

We admired the views down into Coire nan Eun. This really was a stunning ridge walk and we were blessed with near perfect conditions for it.

Summit to Eat freeze dried meals on the approach to Aonach Meadhoin
Summit to Eat freeze dried meals on the approach to Aonach Meadhoin
Adventurer Nic on the summit of Aonach Meadhoin, the sixth of our Camban Munro summits

We sat on a rock to eat our respective Pasta Bolognaise and Chicken Fried Rice meals, before setting off to summit Aonach Meadhoin.

Within half an hour we were on the summit plateau of Aonach Meadhoin, which was fairly flat and marked with a jumbled cairn.

The sun was sinking lower in the sky and our shadows were getting longer.

With food in our bellies we were re-energised and ready for the final push of the day.

Ciste Dhubh was all that stood between us and a night on the benches of Camban Bothy.

Oh, that and a pesky river crossing… it dawned on me that we’d be crossing the river in the dark.

From the summit of Aonach Meadhoin, the Camban Munro Bothy Route became pathless for the first time.

Ciste Dhubh

View of the setting sun over the mountains from the ascent of Ciste Dhubh in the Scottish Highlands

We headed down into the Bealach a’ Choinich (591m) and the area was teeming with deer.

There were more deer than I’d ever seen in a herd, close to one hundred I’d guess. All enjoying the wet bealach.

Watching them disperse as we neared the bealach was mesmerising. They moved so fluidly over the landscape.

We reached the bottom of the col and started the climb up the final Munro of the day – Ciste Dhubh.

The sun was casting a wonderful glow over the surrounding peaks.

We took an incorrect angle on the initial ascent (the low light impeding our ability to pick up the faint path up the south ridge) so we recovered the situation with a steep grassy pull onto the ridge from the west side.

Adventurer Nic and James Forrest pause for a selfie on the summit of Ciste Dhubh
Adventurer Nic and James Forrest pause for a selfie on the summit of Ciste Dhubh

After walking up along the ridge, we made it to the summit of Ciste Dhubh in the most beautiful light.

View from the summit of Ciste Dhubh down the north west ridge at sunset
View from the summit of Ciste Dhubh down the north west ridge at sunset

As we walked from the summit, the sun was setting directly in front of us, with the bulk of Beinn Fhada silhouetted. It was a sight I’ll never forget.

James Forrest descending Ciste Dhubh, silhouetted by the setting sun
James Forrest descending Ciste Dhubh, silhouetted by the setting sun

Over to the left were the series of sharp summits that we’d walked over earlier that day. The obvious peaks of the Five Sisters of Kintail, piercing up and interrupting the hazy, dusky hues of the sky.

James Forrest descending Ciste Dhubh with the setting sun in the distance
James Forrest descending Ciste Dhubh with the setting sun in the distance

As sickening as it sounds, ‘magical’ would be the word I’d use to describe the scene. All the hard times, stresses and strains of life just fall away when you’re faced with such beauty.

Day 1 Descent

Reluctantly, we started the descent towards Camban Bothy, which we knew sat between Glen Lichd and Glen Affric at the foot of Ciste Dhubh.

The route was steep and pathless as we headed off down the north west shoulder of Ciste Dhubh.

James Forrest looking up at the mountains from the descent of Ciste Dhubh in the Scottish Highlands
James Forrest looking up at the mountains from the descent of Ciste Dhubh in the Scottish Highlands

A lone stag eyeballed us for half an hour as we zig-zagged to the valley bottom. Luckily the dusk light lasted for most of the descent before we needed to dig our head torches out of our packs.

Then came the river crossing. Fortunately we’d had two rain-free days and we found a place to cross where there were boulders. Mission accomplished!

First Night in Camban Bothy

We arrived at the bothy at 10:50pm and were greeted by Matt and John (friends from Devon and Norfolk).

A hanging bunny rabbit in Camban Bothy - quite a disturbing sight!

Camban Bothy has two rooms, one to the left and one to the right.

Matt and John quickly made room for us to sleep on the top bunk of the room to the left.

A couple were already settled for the night into the right-hand room.

We chatted to the guys, scoffed some more food and retired to bed, exhausted. 14 Munros in two days had taken it out of us.

Disturbingly, there was a stuffed toy bunny rabbit hanging from the roof of the bothy, which struck me as very macabre!

We fell asleep with the pungent scent of marijuana seeping into the bothy from outside.

Day 2: Morning in Camban Bothy

Door of Camban Bothy, photographed before setting off on our Munro bagging Route for the day
Door of Camban Bothy, photographed before setting off on our Munro bagging Route for the day

Our second day started at Camban Bothy with breakfast outside, accompanied by the other occupants.

We met Nikki and Euan, who slept in the room next door. Nikki was from Nelson, New Zealand and Euan was from Thurso in the far north of Scotland near John O’Groats. Nikki was over here on holiday and they were walking the Affric Kintail Way from Drumnadrochit to Morvich.

We debated the pros and cons of small town life vs city life and hearing of my plans to walk Te Araroa – New Zealand’s long distance trail, Nikki kindly gave me her email address in case she could help with anything.

Camban Bothy on the path that links Glen Lichd with Glen Affric, part of the Affric Kintail Way
Camban Bothy on the path that links Glen Lichd with Glen Affric, part of the Affric Kintail Way

John explained that he’d walked from the North East to the South West of Senja in Norway, bypassing Segla – a mountain that James and I had hiked earlier that year. I mentally added another ‘must do’ to my bucket list!

Delaying our departure (yet again) for the three Munros on our list for the day, we wiled away another half hour discussing kit – notably space and weight saving ideas, plus water filters like the Sawyer Squeeze.

Day 2 Ascent

We finally peeled ourselves away from the conversation. It’s always difficult when you find kind and chatty like-minded people in bothies. You know you’ll never see them again and yet you really value the conversation so you delay leaving as much as possible!

It was a nice day as we followed the Affric Kintail Way north east towards Glen Affric. We reached the youth hostel – Alltbeithe after about 40 minutes.

Nikki had told us to look out for the temporary Hostel Manager, Graham. A lovely ‘live in’ custodian of this remote hostel. A sign told us he was out enjoying the hills and he’d be back later.

For some reason neither James nor I could quench our thirst so we spent a good 20 minutes sitting by the stream, filtering litres of water for the walk ahead.

We ascended following a path which ran alongside the Allt na Faing. We passed a tall blonde-haired man descending with a big pack. I remember I accidentally said “Good morning”, despite it being 12:40pm already. I had no idea where the time had gone!

We ate lunch at the col under Stob Coire na Cloiche, before ascending west, en route to our first Munro of the day – Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan.

We passed two solo, male hill walkers on their way down, the first was a nice chap who stopped to talk for a while. The second was the famous Graham! He promised to chill a couple of cans of fizzy pop in readiness for our return to the hostel after our walk.

Camban Bothy Munro Route: Day 2 Summits

Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan

Adventurer Nic and James Forrest on the summit of Sgurr nan Ceathramhnan in the Scottish Highlands
Adventurer Nic and James Forrest on the summit of Sgurr nan Ceathramhnan in the Scottish Highlands

At the summit of Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan we met another lovely chap who took a photo of us.

I can see how thin I was getting in the above photograph and it scared me a little. I really needed to eat more.

Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan is the 22nd highest Munro on the list.

View from Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan towards the Cuillin Ridge on Skye
View from Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan towards the Cuillin Ridge on Skye

We admired the view to the west, with the Cuillin’s on Skye just visible in the distance.

Mullach na Dheiragain

Adventurer Nic and James Forrest take a selfie on Mullach na Dheiragain
Adventurer Nic and James Forrest take a selfie on Mullach na Dheiragain

We descended together down the north-east ridge to Bealach nan Daoine, accompanied by the lovely man we’d met on the summit of Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan, who I think was called Steve.

It was a very long and undulating ridge to the summit of the second Munro – Mullach na Dheiragain. It was necessary for us to go up and over Carn na Con Dhu en route.

We were in high spirits as we said goodbye to Steve (who was continuing north).

We retraced our steps along the ridge before hitting the lowest point at Bealach nan Daoine. From here we headed down into Coire nan Dearcag.

This was part of the walk was a pathless trudge over peaty terrain. An intense heel pain had flared up by this point in the walk and I wasn’t sure why. It had started as an ache but had developed into a shooting pain as the day had progressed. My energy was sapping and all of a sudden I felt really weak and in desperate need of a rest.

An Socach

James picked up the faint path that got us back to the col between Stob Coire na Cloiche and our final Munro of the day – An Socach.

It was a final push of around 100 metres to the summit and we’d reached our half way Munro! Number 141 of 282!

James Forrest and Adventurer Nic celebrating on the summit of An Socach, which marked the half way point in their Munro round
James Forrest and Adventurer Nic celebrating on the summit of An Socach, which marked the half way point in their Munro round

I collapsed into a seated position on the summit and opened my red dry sack – my snack bag. It was at this point that I noticed a red shiny disc. Could it be? A Babybel! I didn’t realise I had any cheese treats left. Cheese had become my absolute favourite mountain snack. This was just the boost I needed to finish the hike.

James knew that whenever anything miraculous happened, I liked to comfort myself by saying that my Pop (maternal grandfather who’d passed away two years ago) had a hand in it. So James said “Maybe your Pop put it there because he knew you’d need it today?” Well that was it, I sobbed my heart out as I ate it, tears rolling down my cheeks. I think James was genuinely worried I’d completely lost the plot by this point.

James Forrest consoling Adventurer Nic on the summit of An Socach, which marked the half way point in their Munro round
James Forrest consoling Adventurer Nic on the summit of An Socach, which marked the half way point in their Munro round

Day 2 Descent

Composing myself, we descended An Socach back to the col. The route was mostly following a clear path which helped me progress despite the soreness.

James dived into the hostel at Alltbeithe and grabbed the fizzy drinks from Graham, which buoyed us for the final stretch of the walk back to Camban (where we’d stowed our sleeping gear and food supplies for tomorrow).

The next day should have been hiking the Munros Beinn Fhada and A’ Ghlas-bheinn, followed by a third night in Camban bothy and then Mullach Fraoch-choire and A’ Chralaig the day after that, but I think we both knew that I wasn’t capable of another two days of hard hill walking.

We discussed the options –

  1. Me to rest in the bothy all day while James did the 21km Beinn Fhada route as planned
  2. Skip the Beinn Fhada route and do the final day over Mullach Fraoch-choire and A’ Chralaig a day early
  3. Skip both peak bagging days and walk back to the road along the valley.

Jointly, we decided on option 2. Hoping that a good night’s sleep would be just the tonic I needed to get over two more Munros. We would return to Morvich to hike the Beinn Fhada route another day (and it would be the same distance as the route from Camban bothy so we wouldn’t have really lost anything).

Second Night in Camban Bothy

Back at the bothy we found a large group of Belgians in the right hand room, and the tall, blonde guy in the left hand room (the one I’d made the ‘good morning’ faux pas to earlier that afternoon). He turned out to be a lovely Danish guy, travelling alone. The night before he’d wild camped high in the mountains.

We found the bothy register entry from our friend Emily Scott (fellow Munroist who hiked the Munros in 2018 whilst cycling between them) and signed it ourselves before bedding down on the top bunk.

Day 3: Morning in Camban Bothy

Adventurer Nic in the doorway of Camban Bothy in the Scottish Highlands with the shovel for human waste looking very sorry for herself before we continued the Munro Route

We woke in the Camban Bothy to the sounds of the Danish guy quietly packing up his kit to continue along the Affric Kintail Way.

We slowly got our own kit together.

I ate as much breakfast as possible in order to strengthen me for the tough route ahead.

It would only be an 11km day (in comparison to the 27km previous day) and I’d had a good sleep, but it was raining hard and it would be a tough pathless ascent.

I went out with the shovel to do ‘my business’ and James took what could be the most pathetic looking photograph of me ever taken.

Hobbling like an old woman, I was still dealing with the intense pain in my heels. I toyed with just walking out through the valley once more but I decided to go for it. If this was a holiday I would have retreated, but it was a challenge. It was sometimes going to hurt and if it didn’t hurt every now and then, everyone would do it. I popped two Paracetamol and two Ibruprofen, put on my big girl pants and we set of.

Fully waterproofed to the eyeballs, we steeled ourselves for the two 1,100m+ Munros that separated us from the main road.

Day 3 Leaving Camban Bothy to Finish the Munro Route

We set off in drizzle and we had a key navigational choice to make. We either stayed on the Affric Kintail Way to the hostel and then over a bridge to hit the mountainside at its steepest point. Or we took our chances crossing the river earlier and approach the mountainside where it wasn’t as steep. Option two was the more direct route. Either way it would be pathless after the river because these two Munros are seldom climbed from this angle.

I preferred the direct approach, as it would limit the number of kilometres I had to walk on bad feet. So that’s what we did.

We tramped through tall wet grass until we met the river, at the point where the River Affric, the Allt Cam-ban and the Allt a’ Chomhlain all came together. Gulp.

It was obvious there would be no crossing point that didn’t involve getting our feet wet (most likely up to the knees). I knew that if I got my feet wet the climb would be so much harder, probably three times as much.

James said “I could carry you over that” and I laughed out loud. It seemed impossible that James would be able to carry me across the wide river. In order to do so, James himself would have to cross three times – once with the two big rucksacks, once back for me and then again with me on his back!

I was reluctant but James insisted. He walked us across slowly, using his poles for balance and I stayed dry, my hero!

It’s worth noting that this is NOT a recommended method for river crossing. It was a last resort given the state of my feet (fuelled by James’s desire for me to get up the hillside as quickly as possible!)

Day 3 Ascent

The ascent up Mullach Fraoch-choire was slow and arduous both for me and my feet, but also for James who was finding it hard going so slow. I felt a pang of guilt, as I often did at the times when James was clearly stronger than me. I never wanted for him to feel like I was a burden or annoyance. Our challenge was supposed to be fun.

We got to the spine of the wide ridge and stopped for some peanut butter crackers. There was a nice (albeit misty/cloudy) view down Glen Affric.

Using the first scrap of 4G we’d had since two days earlier, James booked a hotel for the next 2 nights. It was a relief to know we’d be sleeping in the first proper bed for the first night in over a week that night. With the biggest part of the ascent behind us, I found it easier going up the ridge onto the summit of the first Munro of the day – Mullach Fraoch-choire.

Camban Bothy Munro Route: Day 3 Summits

Mullach Fraoch-choire

Adventurer Nic and James Forrest take a selfie in wet weather on the summit of Mullach Fraoch Choire in the Scottish Highlands

We paused briefly on the summit and then progressed down and onto the narrower ridge which linked Mullach Fraoch-choire and A’ Chralaig.

It was completely non-technical but I do remember the ridge had a smidgen of exposure, and the swirling mist added drama to the scene.

The Na Geurdain pinnacles were sharp and angular.

I made a mental note to return on a sunny dry day to experience the beauty of the ridge properly.

We went over the summit of Stob Coire na Craileig before progressing south down the ridge to A’ Chraliag – our final mountain of the Camban Bothy Munro Route.

A’ Chralaig

Adventurer Nic and James Forrest take a selfie in wet weather on the summit of A' Chralaig in the Scottish Highlands

I was unbelievably proud of myself for making it to the final summit of A’ Chralaig (sometimes referred to as A’ Chraileag).

It was all downhill from here. Downhill to the Cluanie Inn where I was already planning on ordering huge pizza.

We rested in the thick mist by the summit cairn and planned our descent.

Our car was parked in Morvich and retrieving it had to be our first priority.

We therefore agreed that James would go on ahead of me as soon as we were outside of the ‘death zone’ (i.e. under 1,000m). I’ve no idea why we called it the death zone, it was nothing like being at 8,000m in the Himilayas but the terminology worked for us!

The purpose of James going ahead was to optimising the chances of getting a hitchhike back to the car.

Day 3 Descent

Adventurer Nic finds James's crisp packet that had fallen out of his pocket on the descent of A' Chralaig during our Camban Bothy Munro Route multi-day adventure

It was approximately a twenty minute drive along the A87 to Morvich from the foot of A’ Chralaig.

I was inevitably going to be quite a bit slower than James so it was in both our interests to separate.

After dropping out of the clouds, I could see the main road down in the glen.

The ground was wet and sloppy but there was a path which guided me down.

I found a crisp packet that James had accidentally dropped on the way down so I knew I was on the right path! He’d dislodged it by mistake out of a side pocket, so of course I picked it up for him.

It was actually quite fun because I had a birds eye view of James catching his hitch which was exhilarating!

Every time a car approached I would will it to stop! But it was probably the twentieth car. I saw the little ant shaped character than I knew to be James get in the car and drive away.

In the end I was 45 minutes slower than James in getting down the mountain so I didn’t have to wait long for him to pick me up in a layby on the A87.

Wrapping Up

We drove immediately to the Cluanie Inn and ordered two caesar salads and two pizzas. For some reason we were craving fresh ingredients (and cheese of course).

We scoffed our meals whilst James told me about the chap who picked him up. He was a resident of Skye who’d driven to the mainland for a hospital appointment. He was lonely on the journey so was happy to have James’s company. We then drove to Foyers to check into the hotel.

Our hotel room was called Ness and it overlooked Loch Ness. We each had a hot shower and started the recovery process. There’s nothing quite like laying in a proper bed after over a week of intensive exercise and sleeping on a camping mat.

We nicknamed the Camban Bothy Munros:

  • Grrrrr Fury! – Sgurr Fhuaran
  • Scary Carcrash – Sgurr na Carnach
  • Scare My Sister’s Dumbo – Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe
  • Sale Egg – Saileag
  • Scared I’ll Be Late Doc – Sgurr a’ Bhealaich Dheirg
  • Annie’s Meaty Groin – Aonach Meadhoin
  • Sister Dubstep – Ciste Dhubh
  • Scorpion Cameraman – Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan
  • Mouldy Dragon Again – Mullach na Dheiragain
  • Answer = Ache – An Socach
  • Musical Frog Choir – Mullach Fraoch-choire
  • Achey Leg – A’ Chralaig

Find out why we nicknamed all 282 Munros here.

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist and ‘compleated’ the list over a six month period in 2019. She stood atop each of the 282 Munro summits with her peak bagging partner in adventure – James Forrest. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.

Fisherfield

Adventurer Nic zipping down her tent in front of Shenavall Bothy in the Scottish Highlands before setting off to climb the Fisherfield Munros

…Five Munros and a Night in Shenavall Bothy

James Forrest leaving Beinn Tarsuinn - one of the Fisherfield Munros
James Forrest leaving Beinn Tarsuinn – one of the Fisherfield Munros

Fisherfield Route Introduction

The Fisherfield Round comprises of five Munros in the Scottish Highlands. The five Munros are – Sgurr Ban, Mullach Choire Mhic Fhearchair, Beinn Tarsuinn, A’ Mhaighdean and Ruadh Stac Mor. This route card explains the quickest and easiest way of getting to all five summits for a peak bagger.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Saturday 21st September 2019 as part of her Munro Bagging Challenge. These were Munro numbers 230 to 234 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag these Munros too.

Fisherfield Route Stats

Mountains: Sgurr Ban (989m), Mullach Coire Mhic Fhearchair (1,019m), Beinn Tarsuinn (937m), A’ Mhaighdean (967m) and Ruadh Stac Mor (918m)

Total Distance: 43.9km / 27.28miles

Total Ascent: 2,040m / 6,693ft

Approx Walk Time: 1.5 days

Grid Reference Start: NH 115848

Fisherfield Route Report

The Lead Up

Adventurer Nic walking in towards Shenavall bothy after sunset

We spent the morning walking up An Teallach in glorious sunshine. It was definitely one of the best weather days of the year.

After making it down to the car at Corrie Hallie that afternoon, we switched out our day packs for our overnight packs, scoffed dinner by the car and set straight back out.

Once again we found ourselves on the same stretch of the Cape Wrath Trail that we’d started on earlier that morning, along the Gleann Chaorachain.

We pondered numerous times whether or not we should have stowed gear that morning and somehow linked the seven Munros.

It had seemed like too hard to do at the time…. but now we weren’t so sure!

Adventurer Nic looking down at her feet, illuminated by her head torch whilst hiking at night

We passed the point on the trail where we’d turned off for An Teallach earlier that morning and continued on towards Shenavall bothy. Darkness fell quickly so we continued under the light of our head torches.

As we got closer to the Mountain Bothies Association shelter, the path thinned out and the trail to Shenavall became less obvious. Battling the disorientation that nightfall brings, it constantly felt like we were headed in the wrong direction but we persevered.

It was comforting that we were not alone in the dark that night though. We saw lots of head torches in the distance, possibly from other hikers finishing the Fisherfield circuit in the dark. Shenavall bothy eventually came into view and we descended to it, relieved the night walking was coming to an end.

There was already a large group settled in the bothy so we favoured setting up camp on the grass outside in our tent. We bedded down straight away and set an early alarm for the morning.

Terra Nova Laser Compact 2 tent beside Shenavall bothy at sunrise
Terra Nova Laser Compact 2 tent beside Shenavall bothy at sunrise

Setting Off

Adventurer Nic set off hiking at sunrise towards the Fisherfield Munros

6:50am – our departure time for the long walk of the Fisherfield Munros.

As we were not what you’d consider ‘morning people’, any day we set off walking prior to 8am was something to celebrate!

The beautiful orange, pink and purple hues in the skies helped lure us out of our grogginess.

So many factors could influence how long the walk would take us – the weather, meeting other hikers, number of breaks and so on, but we made a rough estimate that it would take around 12 hours. So an early start was imperative.

We walked alongside the river for well over 5km, passing a derelict house and a woodland area with at least seven tents and bivvy bags set up, with their occupants either still snoozing or just waking up.

Celebration balloon in one of the most remote areas of countryside in the UK

At the river’s edge, we stopped to eat a scrambled egg freeze-dried breakfast meal with coffee, but the midges were out in force so we didn’t stay long.

We carried on and soon stumbled across a foil helium balloon in the middle of the trail.

It was a sad reminder of how far waste can travel if not disposed of properly.

These were the most remote Munros in all of Scotland and I wondered how far the balloon must have drifted to get there.

We picked it up and packed it out of course.

We carried on beside the river until we found a suitable suitable crossing point. Ironically, our guidebook had made specific reference to the fact that wet feet were an inevitability on this section but we made it across successfully on stepping stones.

The dry weather of the previous two days had helped us greatly.

View across the Abhainn Loch an Nid
View across the Abhainn Loch an Nid

The Fisherfield Ascent

We walked across terrain which was a mix of heather and grass up to a boulder strewn ridge. Describing it as ‘boulder strewn’ is probably the understatement of the century. It’s most likely the longest stretch of boulders I’ve ever hiked across – over 2km of quartzite blocks and large stones.

Up to the right was Beinn a’ Chlaidheimh. If I had been walking the Munros back in 2011, I’d have been heading up there but Beinn a’ Chlaidheimh was actually relegated from Munro status after being remeasured and found to fall short of 3,000ft.

The original name for this route was the Fisherfield Six, referring to Beinn a’ Chlaidheimh as one of the six Munros along the route.

Adventurer Nic ascending Sgurr Ban over rocky terrain
Adventurer Nic ascending Sgurr Ban over rocky terrain

Continuing on, we headed up to the left towards the summit of Sgurr Ban.

Our decision to tackle the route clockwise was one I didn’t regret. Reversing the route would involve descending over the sea of rocks. I could foresee lots of accidents here as tired and weary legs made their way down.

Views from the boulder strewn slopes of Sgurr Ban in Scotland
Views from the boulder strewn slopes of Sgurr Ban in Scotland

Ironically, four walkers descended past us just as I’d had that thought. As it was still quite early, they must have wild camped up on the tops.

The Summits

Sgurr Ban

Adventurer Nic with James Forrest eating a bar of Cadbury's Dairy Milk Chocolate on the summit of Sgurr Ban, the first of five Fisherfield Munro mountains

Out of nowhere, the wind picked up a great deal of strength on the big, flat summit top of Sgurr Ban.

James tucked into a big slab of Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate as we appreciated views across the Fisherfield forest and to An Teallach in the north.

Unlike the previous day there was no sun in the sky but the cloud base was high and we rested for a short while by the large summit cairn, which provided a small amount of protection from the wind.

We crossed the large plateau summit of Sgurr Ban across yet more boulders and descended in a southwesterly direction towards the col between this and the next Munro – Mullach Coire Mhic Fhearchair.

Descent to the col between Sgurr Ban and Mullach Coire Mhic Fhearchair

As was often the case, James descended faster than I did, but I caught up with him down at the col.

We looked ahead and could see the steep line of ascent of Mullach Coire Mhic Fhearchair.

It looked rather intimidating but there was a clear path up and the weather was certainly improving.

As we hit the ascent, it was remarkable how much sand there was underfoot. At times it was so soft it was like walking up a sand dune!

The distance between these two Munros felt negligible, but I guess that’s in comparison to the really long walk in to the first Munro.

Mullach Choire Mhic Fhearchair

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Mullach Coire Mhic Fhearchair - one of the Munro mountains in the Fisherfield circuit

We needed to keep an average pace of 2.5km per hour (including breaks) in order to finish the remainder of the walk within the 12 hour target.

This kind of goal setting motivated me to keep going as the hike of the Fisherfield Five got tougher.

From the summit of Mullach Choire Mhic Fhearchair we looked at the route ahead. We would be able to skirt around the bulk of Meall Garbh before heading west towards Beinn Tarsuinn.

Heading south, we descended down to another col. We had lunch here and I checked my legs for ticks and found six of the little buggers!

Luckily they were all tiny and I removed them all easily and completely. The risk of contracting Lyme disease from one of these tiny ticks was low due to me spotting them and removing them quickly. But I stayed vigilant for symptoms throughout my challenge.

A friend later suggested that maybe I’d walked through tick eggs just as they were hatching and maybe that’s why so many tiny ticks (larva) where found on me at one time. As getting so many ticks in one sitting is fairly rare.

Lunch spot between Mullach Choire Mhic Fhearchair and Beinn Tarsuinn
Lunch spot between Mullach Choire Mhic Fhearchair and Beinn Tarsuinn

Beinn Tarsuinn

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Beinn Tarsuinn - one of the Fisherfield Munros

We used the bypass path around Meall Garbh before ascending over terrain which was less sandy and more grassy with small rocks up Beinn Tarsuinn.

The summit of Beinn Tarsuinn marked the ‘halfway point’ of the hike. We’d been moving for exactly six hours.

The weather was now really nice.

It was still breezy but the views were simply incredible and the blue skies made everything look less foreboding and more inviting.

I particularly enjoyed looking at the shape of the river as it flowed into the valley with the jagged pinnacles of An Teallach noticeable in the distance.

Adventurer Nic looking across to An Teallach from Beinn Tarsuinn - one of the Fisherfield Munros
Adventurer Nic looking across to An Teallach from Beinn Tarsuinn – one of the Fisherfield Munros

To the other side sat Slioch, a Munro which we’d hiked the previous month.

But I was the most enthralled by the tennis court shaped flat plateau of rock part way along the ridge in the direction of A’ Mhaighdean. It was a geological phenomenon. A slightly slanted shelf of rock suspended along the ridge.

View from Beinn Tarsuinn of the Tennis Court shaped rock part way along the ridge
View from Beinn Tarsuinn of the Tennis Court shaped rock part way along the ridge

We descended steeply from the summit of Beinn Tarsuinn to see that the ridge wasn’t quite as razor sharp as it looked initially.

James Forrest descending from Beinn Tarsuinn on the Fisherfield walk
James Forrest descending from Beinn Tarsuinn on the Fisherfield walk

As I walked along the ridge, I was beginning to understand why this area had been given the nickname – the Great Wilderness.

There were no buildings in sight, no signs of civilisation, it was just an expanse of mountains, valleys and lochs as far as the eye could see, in every direction.

Adventurer Nic walk along the west ridge of Beinn Tarsuinn
Adventurer Nic walk along the west ridge of Beinn Tarsuinn

A’ Mhaighdean

Adventurer Nic and James Forrest on the summit of A' Mhaighdean

We descended steeply, following a faint path into a boggy peaty section between Beinn Tarsuinn and A’ Mhaighdean.

In our guidebook, we’d read that it could be wet here but the ground was firm and dry in the main.

This was a relief and we made decent progress.

We headed uphill, following a faint path most of the way, whilst bypassing crags.

After seeing nobody since the ascent on Sgurr Ban we were surprised to summit A’ Mhaighdean at the exact same time as another hiker. He approached from the northeast as we arrived from the southeast.

View from A' Mhaighdean to the southwest with the Torridon Munros in the far distance
View from A’ Mhaighdean to the southwest with the Torridon Munros in the far distance

We were now stood on (what’s widely reported to be) the most remote Munro on the whole list of 282. Another Munro bagging milestone achieved. It felt great!

Ruadh Stac Mor

Adventurer Nic, celebrating on the summit of Ruadh Stac Mor - 5 Munros in the bag

As we left the summit of A’ Mhaighdean, we put our waterproofs on as it started to rain lightly.

Luckily, a clear path led us to the col between A’ Mhaighdean and Ruadh Stac Mor – our fifth and final Munro of the day.

Next came the scramble up red stone scree. This was such a stark difference in terrain from the soft sandy approach to Mullach Choire Mhic Fhearchair and the grey blocks of Sgurr Ban. It was amazing to think these peaks were all part of the same walk!

There were a few awkward big red blocks to scramble over before we reached the summit of Munro number 5 – Ruadh Stac Mor.

The Fisherfield Descent

With all five Munros now in the bag we readied ourselves for the long descent. We started down a short bouldery section, taking our time on the slick rock, before aiming for the gap between two lochans – marked on the map as Lochan a Bhraghad.

The groans of the rutting stags were echoing all around us.

Keeping Ruadh Stac Beag on our right, we dropped downhill following a burn to the north west.

The rain kept coming and going but luckily it was never too heavy.

We crossed some lumpy bumpy ground to join the stalkers path which would lead us along Gleann na Muice Beag. Our average hiking pace was up to 5km as we enjoyed a gentle descent deeper into the valley. The path then ran alongside the western bank of the Abhainn Gleann na Muice.

We crossed the river just before Larachantivore. We managed to get half way across on stepping stones before realising we couldn’t complete the crossing with dry feet. So we sat on a large rock in the middle of the river while we removed our boots and paddled the second half barefoot.

This worked quite well as it was refreshing for our tired feet but kept our boots dry.

Then came the notoriously boggy section. People have been known to fall into waist high bogs here. We avoided the worst parts by testing the ground with our hiking poles. Prodding to test the depth of each section of ground.

We finally reached the river opposite Shenavall bothy and we removed our boots again to wade across.

Shenavall Bothy

Adventurer Nic standing outside Shenavall Bothy
Adventurer Nic standing outside Shenavall Bothy

We met a Belgian couple in the bothy who were walking a section of the Cape Wrath Trail from Fort William to Ullapool. They’d originally intended on walking the whole trail but had been caught in a bad storm in Knoydart and Iris had an accident during a river crossing which almost saw her swept away. We swapped adventure stories for a while before going to bed early.

This time we slept in the bothy itself rather than the tent. I found a total of two more ticks – bringing my total for the day to eight. And then found an additional one on James. I removed them all before settling down to sleep (removing ticks was certainly becoming second nature!)

Wrapping Up

In the morning, we got up leisurely and said goodbye to our two bothy-mates. It was a 2.5 hour walk back to the car, which was parked by the Dundonnell River.

Upon reaching the car, I immediately scoffed two bags of crisps back to back.

We then had one of those delirious moments, common during our Munro round, where we went a bit wappy. We put High Hopes (by Panic at the Disco) on high volume as we drove to Ullapool for food supplies, singing the lyrics at the top of our lungs.

Food, Shower and More Food

Post Fisherfield lunch - poached eggs and avocado on bagels

We bought food to last two days and drove on to Ledgowan Lodge in Achnasheen.

We dried the tent on the grass by the bunkhouse and prepared a massive lunch.

My portion alone consisted of two toasted bagels, three poached eggs and half a smashed avocado.

Doing a challenge like this means there is zero guilt associated with eating large meals. I certainly made the most of it!

Food came before showers on this occasion, as it often did on the challenge.

In the bunkhouse we were given rooms 1 and 2 (single rooms only) and we had the place to ourselves for the night.

Dinner after the Fisherfield Munros - sweet potato curry with a side of the IT Crowd

We caught up with family, friends and social media after a few days off-grid in the Fisherfield wilderness.

Before long our thoughts turned to food again. We cooked sweet potato, pepper, onion and spinach curry with naan bread, rice, poppadoms and dips. All washed down with a pint of Irn Bru and an episode of the IT Crowd.

My tick removal duties weren’t yet over as I found yet another two ticks on James’s foot before we went to the main hotel so that James could do some work on the WiFi.

At one point a man walked past us and said “so this is where the cool kids hang out” but I heard it as “so this is where the coke heads hang out” and looked at him horrified. The Fisherfield Munros had scrambled my ears!

We nicknamed the Fisherfield Munros:

  • Scary Bants – Sgurr Ban
  • Male Ache Covers My Fear Of Chairs – Mullach Choire Mhic Fhearchair
  • Beef Chop Suey – Beinn Tarsuinn
  • A Mega Deal – A’ Mhaighdean
  • Rude To Stack More – Ruadh Stac Mor

Find out why we nicknamed all 282 Munros here.

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist and ‘compleated’ the list over a six month period in 2019. She stood atop each of the 282 Munro summits with her peak bagging partner in adventure – James Forrest. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.

An Teallach

Sgurr Fiona, viewed from the ascent. Sgurr Fiona is a Munro summit of An Teallach in the north west Scottish highlands

Route Introduction

An Teallach is a Scottish mountain with two Munro summits – Sgurr Fiona and Bidein a’Ghlas Thuill. Arguably the most dramatic and beautiful mountain on the UK mainland, An Teallach can be found south west of the village of Dundonnell in the far north west of the Highlands. This route card explains the quickest and easiest way of getting to both summits for a peak bagger.

Adventurer Nic walked this route on Saturday 21st September 2019 as part of her Munro Bagging Challenge. These were Munro numbers 228 and 229 of 282 for Nic. Here, she explains how you can bag these Munros too.

An Teallach Route Stats

Mountains: Sgurr Fiona (1,058m) and Bidein a’Ghlas Thuill (1,062m)

Total Distance: 16.5km / 10.3miles

Total Ascent: 1,090m / 3,576ft

Approx Walk Time: 6.5 hours

Grid Reference Start: NH 115848

An Teallach Route Report

The Lead Up

An Teallach as seen from the approach road
An Teallach as seen from the approach road

The day before my boyfriend James and I climbed An Teallach we were ‘compleating’ our Black Cuillin Munros on the Isle of Skye under the expert guiding of Adrian Trendall. We descended our final Cuillin Munro, Sgurr Alasdair, and said goodbye to Adrian.

We headed part way to An Teallach and camped in woodland, a quiet spot somewhere in Strathgarve Forest.

After a decent sleep, despite persistent flashbacks the thrilling (terrifying) experience of the Great Stone Chute on the Black Cuillin the previous day, we got dressed and drove to the start of the An Teallach walk. Initially, we aimed for the Corrie Hallie car park, but this was a sunny Saturday so it was already full. Instead, we secured one of the last spaces in a smaller car park slightly further south.

Setting Off

Adventurer Nic on the early part of the walk with Beinn Dearg (Ullapool) and surrounding Munros in the background
Adventurer Nic on the early part of the walk with Beinn Dearg (Ullapool) and surrounding Munros in the background

We walked for a short section on the road before setting off on a track. This track was in fact the Cape Wrath Trail. Many of our Munro walks happen to use parts of this iconic long distance route. The track was wide and we nervously shuffled past a field full of cows. We are always anxious passing cattle after a friend was trampled by a herd in North Wales only last year.

An Teallach from the Cape Wrath Trail in the north west Scottish highlands
An Teallach from the Cape Wrath Trail

We crossed on a bridge over the Allt Gleann Charachain before the trail rose to 300m in elevation and we took the right hand fork in the path. Behind us was Beinn Dearg (Ullapool) and over to the left were the Fannichs. We were treated to a lovely view of An Teallach as we glanced up to the right. Parallel to Lochan na Brathan, we peeled off the trail and hit the open hillside.

The Ascent

We followed intermittent faint paths and generally stuck to a north west bearing, leading onto the ridge – first walking over 954m Sail Liath and then 960m Stobh Cadha Gobhlach.

Adventurer Nic en route to Sgurr Fiona - a Munro summit of An Teallach in the north west Scottish highlands
Adventurer Nic en route to Sgurr Fiona

From here you have amazing views of the pinnacles of An Teallach and both Munro summits. We paused for a while here to appreciate the view. A gorgeous blue sky, a sunny late September day in Scotland with no midges! It really doesn’t get much better than this.

Adventurer Nic standing looking across to the pinnacles of An Teallach in North West Scotland
Adventurer Nic standing looking across to the pinnacles of An Teallach

We followed a path steeply down, before rising up again, bypassing to the left of another pinnacle. It was only right that we stopped to enjoy lunch on a grassy platform with stunning views. We had a great vantage point from which we could watch people descending the mountain in front of us. We had a much longer lunch break than we normally allowed ourselves. The pure beauty of the scene demanded it.

Adventurer Nic is a dot in this photo, standing on a rocky pinnacle on the ascent of An Teallach, a Munro mountain in the remote Scottish highlands
Adventurer Nic is a mere dot in this photo

The Walker’s Bypass

James Forrest making his way up An Teallach in the North West Scottish Highlands
James Forrest making his way up An Teallach

We continued, following a loose gravel path upwards. And when it forked we somewhat reluctantly took the left option. This is the bypass option which cuts out the grade 3 scrambling over the pinnacles. Two back-to-back days on the Black Cuillin had sent my legs to jelly and my shot my nerves, so tackling some grade 3 scrambling without a rope seemed a foolish option to take. The pinnacles of An Teallach require a lot of down climbing. It felt a step too far for our skill level.

Adventurer Nic sitting to admire the view over to the Fisherfields from the ascent of An Teallach in the north west Scottish highlands
Adventurer Nic sitting to admire the view over to the Fisherfields

The bypass runs to the left of the pinnacles and we enjoyed beautiful views of the Fisherfield Munros from the trail.

The Summits of An Teallach

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Sgurr Fiona. A Munro summit on An Teallach in the North West Scottish Highlands

We made our way up to the summit of Sgurr Fiona from the bypass path. Standing proud at 1,058m tall, the Munro summit of Sgurr Fiona is marked by a cairn.

After seeing multiple other hillwalkers all day, we were surprised to find ourselves alone on the summit.

Next, we followed the ridge down and onwards towards Bidein a’Ghlas Thuill.

The weather really was as close to perfect as it could get, with glorious visibility all day and a light breeze so it wasn’t too hot.

The ridge soon rose back up again and led us onto the second Munro summit – Bidein a’Ghlas Thuill – the bigger of the two Munros. The sun nicely silhouetted the route of ascent behind us, creating a dreamy atmosphere.

Adventurer Nic walking towards the summit of Bidein A'Ghlas Thuill. A Munro summit on An Teallach in the North West Scottish Highlands
Adventurer Nic walking towards the summit of Bidein A’Ghlas Thuill

The true summit of Bidein a’Ghlas Thuill is reportedly a rock 6 metres south of the trig pillar. So, as usual, I stood on all the likely contenders!

The Descent

Adventurer Nic on the summit of Bidein A'Ghlas Thuill. A Munro summit on An Teallach in the North West Scottish Highlands

From the summit of Bidein a’Ghlas Thuill, we headed off northwards to a col before turning eastwards and descending down an eroded path into the valley.

Once in the valley, we picked up another intermittent path, which ran alongside a stream.

It was deliciously shady in the bowl of the valley and it was such a relief after a warm day.

We made an error towards the end of the route as we lost the path, ending up in the grip of some crazily high rhododendron bushes which spat us out into a field and into more bushes. We were trapped somehow between the bushes and the river. And annoyingly, the sounds coming from the road seemed so close! We backtracked to the field and were able to get back onto the road without having to cross the river. In hindsight it might have been better to have crossed the river earlier and approached the road on the east side of the river. Something to consider if you decide to follow this route.

It was less than a kilometre to walk back to the car to finish.

Wrapping Up

Adventurer Nic walking towards the pinnacles of An Teallach in North West Scotland
An unforgettable day in the Scottish Hills

We nicknamed these Munros ‘Slurry Fiona’ and ‘Bidding on a Glass of Fuel’. Find out why we nicknamed all 282 Munros here.

We re-fuelled our bodies, re-hydrated with lots of water and packed our overnight bags. The day wasn’t over for us as we headed back on the Cape Wrath Trail in the direction of Shenavall bothy, ready to walk the Fisherfield Munros.

About the Author

Photo of Adventurer Nic on a Loch in the Scottish Highlands

Adventurer Nic is a Munroist and ‘compleated’ the list over a six month period in 2019. She stood atop each of the 282 Munro summits with her peak bagging partner in adventure – James Forrest. Let her know what you thought of this post by dropping her a comment.